GDPR – New Privacy Regulations in the Old World

GDPR – New Privacy Regulations in the Old World

You have likely heard that the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is here. But do you know what it is, what it means and who it applies to? Here’s an overview.

What is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

The GDPR legislation replaces the 1995 Data Protection Directive and was designed to unify data protection laws across the European Union while providing greater data control and protection for European Union citizens.

Why was it brought into force?

Today’s world revolves around data and it is dramatically different from the world in which the 1995 directive was developed. Many of the original provisions are valid and remain, but the increasing number of privacy and data breaches have made it imperative to update this policy for a number reasons – including the need to protect European Union citizens.

How is GDPR different from the 1995 Data Protection Directive?

Who does it apply to?

  • GDPR primarily applies to businesses established in the European Union but it also applies to businesses based outside European Union that offer goods or services to European Union residents or collect data about European Union residents (Article 2 – Material Scope and Article 3 – Territorial Scope)

What does compliance mean?

  • Because of the complexity of this legislation, full compliance requirements will vary. Please seek information from an appropriately qualified source such as your professional or legal counsel.

When does compliance enforcement begin?

  • 25 May 2018

In there a grace period?

  • The European Parliament approved GDPR in April 2016 and if was officially published in May 2016. There is no grace period.

Where can I go for more information?

Sources:

Disclaimer

The materials in this post do not constitute legal advice and others and are provided for general information purposes only. It is recommended that you contact your general or legal counsel.

PADI Business Academy- Sydney

Join us on Wednesday 27th and Thursday 28th June 2018 in Sydney,  for our two day PADI Business Academy!

PADI-Business-Academy

This two day PADI Business Academy will aim to highlight the importance of understanding and evolving your business model to meet the needs of today’s consumers.

Over the course of the two days, attendees can expect to gain further knowledge on the following topics:

  • Website
  • Customer Service
  • Sales & Pricing
  • Email Marketing
  • PADI’s Digital Space
  • Business Management
  • Social Media & Video
  • Tourism & Niche Markets

There will also be dedicated workshop time at the conclusion of the day, where PADI staff will help you work on specific action plans for your dive operation.

BONUS – EARLY BIRD OFFER
Register your place before Wednesday 16th of May 2018, to receive AUD $20 off the cost of your registration. Plus, with every third paid attendee, you will receive a fourth free. So get in quick and register your spot today!

Click Here To Register

The number of attendees is limited to ensure that the PADI Business Academy staff can really focus on you. Register today to make sure you don’t miss out!

For more information, please contact your PADI Regional Manager or email Brooke.McConnell@padi.com.au

You can also view the rest of the upcoming PADI Business Academies for 2018 here.

 

 

 

Register Now for PADI Rescue Workshop, Gold Coast

We are excited to announce that PADI Asia Pacific will be conducting a PADI Rescue Workshop held in the Gold Coast on Sunday 27th May 2018 at 9:30am.

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Open to all divers, regardless of certification level or training organisation, you will have the opportunity to practice your rescue skills and gain insights into additional rescue skills and qualifications you could earn in the future. So get in early and register your spot today.

Click here to register

To participate you will need to provide;

  • Diving equipment- must be in good working order and include a BCD, regulator, instruments, cylinder, exposure, protection suitable for 21-24 degree water and weights
  • Proof of diving certification
  • A current medial certificate showing you are fit for recreational scuba diving

Tickets are free of charge and numbers are limited so priority will be given to those that register in advance. Register today so you don’t miss out.

Contact your PADI Regional Manager or email instdev@padi.com.au for more information.

May Tips from the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management Team

In 2018 the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management team continues to bring you tips from PADI staff in the field on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities. This month we heard from PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management Consultant and Qualified Barrister, Rebecca Wastall.

“Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” – Will Rogers

“In today’s changing world I don’t think we can ignore the importance of insurance. Make sure you are protected as a dive professional. We live in litigious times and comprehensive cover should be at the top of your agenda.” Rebecca Wastall

Rebecca Wastall, PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management Consultant

Insurance, a topic no one likes discussing! It’s something that most don’t want to buy but feel they are forced into purchasing. Insurance seems to dominate everything we do, from driving a vehicle to travel to sporting activities. We can’t move without someone saying “you need insurance for that”. Depending on where you are based in Asia Pacific depends entirely on whether it is or isn’t compulsory to have insurance in the diving industry too. As it stands any member that goes to work as a dive professional in Australia, Fiji, French Polynesia and New Caledonia are required by law to have insurance. This is regardless of your country of origin or how long you intend to stay.

So we shouldn’t be surprised that so many diving professional decide not to purchase insurance when it’s not compulsory for the great majority and can therefore be ignored? Absolutely not. A few years ago litigation was unheard of in places like Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. Unfortunately today’s world is bringing new challenges and those that thought “it’s not required so I won’t invest” are unfortunately on occasion regretting their decisions.

In the last six months there have been several cases of negligence where court proceedings have been issued in the Asia Pacific Region. In most of the cases the allegations are vehemently denied. Most of these stores did not have insurance and now have to fight their way through the court system either unaided or by paying privately. With legal bills in excess of $100k, companies are struggling to find the fees to fight. All of these new cases are in countries not normally associated with issuing legal proceedings.

People it seems, be it through media attention, advertisements of lawyers or otherwise, are becoming familiar with bringing compensation claims. Looking for fault, regardless of whether it can or can’t be justified. People are becoming aware they can bring a civil law suit anywhere in the world providing they apply the legal principles laid down by the country where the incident took place. With the introduction of the “no win no fee” system people are thinking there is nothing to lose. Anyone can bring a claim. You need to ask yourself are you in a position to defend it?

PADI Risk Management Seminar in Koh Tao 2018

Have you considered how you would pay for legal proceedings if you were to be sued as a company, as an individual or both? Do you have that contingency? Do you understand that as a company you could be liable for anything your instructors do under employment or when using freelancers. Vicarious liability is strict in nature and if an incident takes place and falls within the remit of diving it is likely the claimant will sue the store as well as the individual as the store is more likely to be solvent and able to pay.

Obviously we don’t want our members to be placed in this position. Check and double check your paperwork, keep your training up to date and be cautious when people complain of ailments that could be associated with many different conditions. Always treat the worst case scenario. This is safe and best practice. What you need to ask yourself however, is, is this enough? Has our liability culture struck a new level, a level we would be foolish to ignore?
In the scheme of a business expense, for an individual or company, insuring yourself or your dive centre is not expensive in nature. Yes, it is an extra cost but it is good to at least explore the benefits it could give you. There are many insurance companies available to give you Liability Insurance. PADI works closely with our approved partner V Insurance as we feel it gives good cover in many areas. It has been specifically designed for PADI Asia Pacific Members. It provides both Public and Product Liability, Professional Indemnity, assistance in criminal prosecutions, coronial inquests, workplace health and safety defence costs as well as crisis and media management. For exact cover and figures please go to padiinsurance.com.au for more details.

In terms of how much you will be paying out, well it may be less than you think. For a few hundred dollars you are getting a comprehensive insurance support package.

If you would like further information and would like to speak with the V insurance specialist team on:

1300 945 547 (Toll Free Australia Only) or (+61 2) 8599 8660
Email: padi@vinsurancegroup.com
Web: www.padiinsurance.com.au

If you have any concerns about incidents or potential liability problems occurring please feel free to call or email the Quality Management Department on +61 2945542841 or by email at qa@padi.com.au.

PADI Instructor Examinations for April, 2018

04 Apr | Mabul, Malaysia

04 Apr | Whitianga, New Zealand

05 Apr | Koh Lanta, Thailand

06 Apr | Komodo, Indonesia

06 Apr | Neil Island, Andamans, India

07 Apr | Bali, Indonesia

07 Apr | Cairns, Australia

09 Apr | Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka

10 Apr | Gili Islands, Indonesia

14 Apr | Sanya, China

sanya

14 Apr | Semporna, Malaysia

15 Apr | Moalboal, Philippines

17 Apr | Malapascua, Philippines

21 Apr | Jakarta, Indonesia

21 Apr | Phuket, Thailand

21 Apr | Shenzhen, China

21 Apr | Sydney, Australia

21 Apr | Tioman Island, Malaysia

24 Apr | Koh Tao, Thailand

24 Apr | Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

26 Apr | Dunedin, New Zealand

28 Apr | Jeju Island, South Korea

28 Apr | Melbourne, Australia

How Diving Affects Your Health and Circulatory System

By the Divers Alert Network Medical Team www.danap.org

Scuba diving exposes you to many effects, including immersion, cold, hyperbaric gases, elevated breathing pressure, exercise and stress, as well as a post dive risk of gas bubbles circulating in your blood. Your heart’s capacity to support an elevated blood output decreases with age and with disease. Having a healthy heart is of the utmost importance to your safety while scuba diving as well as to your ability to exercise generally and your life span.

In this article, we explore how the various aspects of diving affect your heart and cardiovascular system.

Effects of Immersion

Immersion in water near the temperature of the human body exposes your body to a pressure gradient, which shifts blood from the vessels in your legs to those in your chest cavity. This increases the volume of blood within your chest by up to 24 ounces (700 milliliters).

Your heart thus takes in an additional 6 to 8 ounces (180 to 240 milliliters) of blood, resulting in an enlargement of all four chambers, an increase in pressure in your right atrium, a more than 30-percent increase in cardiac output and a slight increase in your overall blood pressure.

Baroreceptors (sensors that perceive a change in blood pressure) within your body’s major vessels react to all these changes by decreasing the activity of your sympathetic nervous system, which governs what’s popularly called the “fight-or-flight” response. As a result, your heart rate declines and the concentration in your plasma of norepinephrine, a hormone of the sympathetic nervous system drops; in response to the drop in norepinephrine, your kidneys excrete more sodium, and your urine production increases.

Effects of Cold

Water has high thermal conductivity — that is, your body loses more heat when you’re immersed in water than when you’re in dry air. You’ll feel more comfortable at a given air temperature than when you’re immersed in water of the same temperature. And when your body loses heat, that intensifies the narrowing of your peripheral blood vessels (a condition known as “peripheral vasoconstriction”). This in turn sends more blood to your heart, which increases the filling pressure on the right side of your heart and makes it pump more blood. Constriction of the body’s small arteries also increases the resistance to blood flowing through the periphery of your body, which raises your blood pressure, meaning your heart has to exert itself more to maintain an adequate flow of blood throughout your body.

Effects of Pressure

Breathing air under increased pressure, as you do when scuba diving, also affects your heart and circulatory system. Increased levels of oxygen cause vasoconstriction, increase your blood pressure and reduce your heart rate and heart output. And increased levels of carbon dioxide — which may accumulate in the body when you exercise during a dive, due to reduced pulmonary ventilation caused by dense gases — can increase the flow of blood through your brain, which can speed up oxygen toxicity if you’re breathing a hyperoxic gas mix (one with an elevated level of oxygen).

Effects of Exercise

Diving can be very physically demanding, but recreational divers have the option of choosing diving conditions and activities that typically do not require a lot of exertion. Nevertheless, any dive places some metabolic energy demands on your body. For example, slow, leisurely swimming on the surface represents a moderate-intensity activity, while swimming with fins on the surface requires up to 40 percent less energy than barefoot swimming. But the addition of scuba equipment increases drag on the swimmer and thus the energy cost of swimming. A 1996 paper in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise showed that wearing just one scuba tank may increase a diver’s energy consumption by 25 percent over regular surface swimming at the same speed and that using a drysuit may result in another 25 percent increase in energy consumption.

Most dives at neutral buoyancy and with no current require only short intervals of intermittent swimming at a slow pace and thus represent low- to moderate-intensity exercise. Exercise intensity is measured by a value known as metabolic equivalent (MET), with 1 MET representing the amount of energy consumed when at rest. It is suggested that divers be able to sustain exercise at 6 METs for a period of 20 to 30 minutes. Since people can sustain only about 50 percent of their peak exercise capacity for a protracted period, it is recommended that divers be able to pass an exercise stress test at 12 METs.

Effects of Stress

Your autonomic nervous system (ANS) — the largely involuntary system that regulates internal functions such as your heart rate, respiratory rate and digestion — is affected by diving, too. Among the components of the ANS are the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems; while the sympathetic system governs your body’s “fight-or-flight” response, the parasympathetic system governs resting functions and helps your body conserve energy. In healthy individuals, diving generally increases parasympathetic effects, preserving the heart rate and a measure known as heart rate variability. A dive that is perceived as stressful, however, pushes the ANS in the other direction, meaning sympathetic effects prevail — resulting in an increase in the heart rate, a decline in heart rate variability and an increase in the risk of arrhythmia.

Serious Adverse Effects

Most of the effects that diving has on your heart and circulatory system fall within your body’s capacity to adapt, but sometimes serious adverse reactions can occur. A reaction known as bradyarrhythmia (a very slow and irregular heartbeat) can cause sudden death upon a diver’s entry into the water, especially in individuals with a pre-existing rhythm anomaly. Conversely, tachyarrhythmia (a very rapid and irregular heartbeat) can also cause sudden death, especially in divers with structural or ischemic heart disease. And overexertion or the effects of stress may strain the heart and result in acute manifestations of previously undiagnosed ischemic heart disease.

Breath-hold diving can have particularly serious adverse cardiac effects; these effects occur in quick succession in a response known as the “diving reflex.” Its most significant elements include bradycardia (a slowing of the heart rate); the peripheral vasoconstriction reaction described above; and progressive hypoxia (or lack of an adequate supply of oxygen). To avoid bursting a lung, scuba divers must not hold their breath during ascent.

Position Vacant: RTO Coordinator (Aus)


We have an exciting career opportunity for an RTO Coordinator to join the PADI Asia Pacific team based in Sydney, Australia.

The RTO Coordinator will provide support for PADI Members with enquiries related to RTO training, customer service and compliance.

As a minimum requirement, you should have a Certificat IV in Training and Assessment together with 2 years of experience.

For further information, please view the job description here.

To apply, please send your CV to:

Alison Vasek
Human Resources Manager
PADI Asia Pacific
alison.vasek@padi.com.au