2019 PADI Women’s Dive Day Success

On Saturday 20th July 2019, PADI Dive Centers, Resorts and Instructors came together to celebrate PADI’s fifth annual PADI Women’s Dive Day event. This year we saw more than 770 events take place in 83 countries, 215 of which took place in the Asia Pacific region. We would like to thank all our incredible PADI Members who took part in PADI Women’s Dive Day this year. You helped bring together thousands of divers and non-divers alike, while strengthening the bonds within the dive community. The continued success of PADI Women’s Dive Day is only possible due to your constant enthusiasm and participation.

Although each PADI Women’s Dive Day event was unique, all events had a main focus on strengthening female participation in scuba diving and creating more ocean stewards. PADI Women’s Dive Day events included everything from underwater cleanups to fundraisers, PADI courses and much more. Here are just a few examples of how PADI Dive Centers, Resorts and Instructors celebrated PADI Women’s Dive Day:

Blue Marlin Dive in Gili Trawangan, Indonesia
Abyss Scuba Diving in Sydney, Australia
Casa Escondida in the Philippines
Sunreef Diving in Mooloolaba, Australia
Ceningan Divers in Bali, Indonesia
Siren Diving Lembongan in Indonesia
Malapascua Exotic Island Dive Resort in the Philippines

See more of #PADIWomensDiveDay as told by you in the PADI Women’s Dive Day 2019 photo album on Facebook.

Get Divers Back into The Water with the PADI ReActivate Program

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Tony Cook.

Purchasing the PADI ReActivate Scuba Refresher Program is as easy as 1-2-3 for the diver and for you as the PADI Professional.

Consider this scenario: A diver contacts you and says that they want to get back into diving. They completed their PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course in 1997 and still have their certification card.

What would you do?

One option is to tell them to go to padi.com and purchase the PADI ReActivate eLearning product, which they can download to their tablet or mobile device.

Alternatively, you could purchase the Reactivate Touch on their behalf. It’s a simple and quick process. This not only puts the right product into their hands but it also gives you the opportunity to up sell an in water scuba skills session to refresh their skills. By completing both the knowledge component of the course with ReActivate and scuba skills with you, the diver will receive a certificate of completion and a replacement certification card.

The scuba skills session is also an opportunity for you to promote your new line of masks, fins and snorkels that have just arrived in store. Not to mention that shore dive or the PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty course that’s scheduled around the time of their scuba refresher.

How do I order the PADI ReActivate eLearning product?

Ordering the PADI ReActivate eLearning Touch product is very easy. With the product code you can order directly from your PADI Regional Training Consultant or from the Online Shop. To find the course code sign into the PADI Pros` Site and scroll down until you find the appropriate price lists.

Did you know that the front cover of the downloaded price list contains a hyperlink to the Digital Products page?

Spoiler Alert – the product code for ReActivate eLearning is 71926-1.

The ReActivate Touch product is currently available in six languages – English, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish and includes a certifying credit.

Now that you`ve logged in you might as well click on the ‘Shop Now’ button and place your order. It’s a great idea to have a few codes ready for those divers wanting to refresh their scuba skills.

For more information on how to order PADI Materials online, check out our recent blog on ‘Ordering PADI Materials Online’.

How do I advertise the PADI ReActivate course?

You can find a range of PADI ReActivate marketing materials and information on how to set up digital product affiliation links on the PADI Pros` Site. Take advantage of this great opportunity to increase your business by engaging with divers on your contact list who you haven’t seen in a while.

Contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant for more information.

PADI Instructor Examinations for June 2019

Congratulations to the new PADI Instructors from the Asia Pacific region last month.

New Collections Available at PADI Gear

The PADI Gear™ team has been busy! The pro-only custom marketplace (Asia Pacific) just launched and there are new collections coming. With your 20% off Pro Gear deal, you’re going to look great in this high-quality, professional apparel.

Sharks are Taking Over

For most dive pros, every week is Shark Week. Insider intel says that sharks are taking over PADI Gear. In honor of Shark Awareness Day and Shark Week, and to celebrate their toothy awesomeness, look for new  products dedicated to sharks and shark protection. In fact, 15% of PADI Gear proceeds from shark-related products will be donated to Project AWARE® to help in the fight to protect endangered and vulnerable shark species.

There’s shark apparel for men and women as well as an incredible limited-edition collaboration launching with a talented shark photographer. (You’ll have to check back to see who it is.)

Watch this space for more exciting product announcements.

Order today.

Conducting CESA

The Controlled Emergency Swimming Ascent (CESA) is one of the most complex skills in the Open Water Diver course. It’s also an important emergency procedure to learn. After successfully completing the skill in confined water, applying it in open water instills confidence in novice divers that in the unlikely situation in which an alternate or redundant air isn’t available in an emergency, there is another option.

Organizing the skill so students fulfill the requirements in open water takes logistical preparation. Here’s clarification of some key points to help you set this skill up for success.

The requirements in the Open Water Diver Course Instructor Guide from the PADI® Instructor Manual state:

Setting up the Exercise

Use a vertical control line buoyed by a surface float. Ensure that the line is either tied off firmly at the bottom or held down with sufficient weight to enable you to stop the ascent at any time by grasping it with a hand or leg wrap while holding the student firmly. Conduct the skill one student at a time while maintaining physical contact with both the student and the control line.

The intent of using a secured vertical line is to provide you with as much control as possible in terms of ascent rate, stopping or slowing the ascent, and monitoring the student’s exhalation while looking for signs of stress. For proper control, you must grasp both the student and the control line. Either hold the line with your hand or use the leg wrap technique to maintain contact with the line.

Holding the Student

A common, effective technique is to firmly grasp the student’s BCD at a point where you can position yourself slightly higher than the student. This allows you to easily see the student’s face looking up toward you, and hear and see continual exhalation. Remember not to hold your own breath while watching and listening for your student’s continual exhalation as you both ascend.

Holding the Line

Effective control means you can immediately stop or slow the diver’s ascent. This can only be done if the line is thick enough and is secured both at the bottom and surface.

  • Line thickness
    • The diameter must be large enough (at least 12 millimetres/½ inch) to allow you to easily wrap your leg or hand around it, pull it taut, and stop you and the diver from further ascent. A thin line, such as a reel line, does not provide enough stability or adequate support to reliably stop an ascent.
  • Line secured
    • At the surface. The line must be secure at the surface. If secured to a float, ensure that the float is big enough so it doesn’t submerge when you pull on the line. It must have enough buoyancy to remain on the surface with two divers (you and the student) on the line. Surface marker buoys or small floats that easily submerge do not provide enough positive buoyancy for this skill. Keep in mind that the float also serves as a buoyant surface support at the end of the skill once the student reaches the surface.
  • At the bottom. The line must also be secured on the bottom. It must not pull free when used to halt two divers’ ascent. Secure the line using something that will hold the line firmly on the bottom (such as an anchor); or to a bottom attachment, such as a mooring pin. The bottom composition and location will dictate what is most appropriate. You know that securing a line to coral or other living bottom material is inappropriate.

When set up in this manner, the CESA line can also be used as a descent/ascent line during training, and provide a secured reference to conduct other skills during the Open Water Diver course.

For additional tips and techniques, review the Open Water Diver Course Conduct and Skill Recommendations in PADI’s Guide to Teaching.

This originally appeared in the 2nd Quarter 2019 Training Bulletin. You can read a PDF of the full edition here.

The 2019 PADI Retail and Resort Master Scuba Diver Challenge Starts 1 August

Get ready for a friendly competition! Enter the 2019 Master Scuba Diver™ (MSD) Challenge from 1 August through 31 December 2019 and you could win your 2020 PADI® Retailer & Resort Association Membership renewal. You’ll also gain bragging rights and receive special recognition in PADI’s eNewsletter – Surface Interval.

How to Win

The PADI Dive Centers or Resorts showing the most percentage growth in Master Scuba Diver certifications (as compared to the same time frame last year) will win. You’ll only compete against others in your competitor group:

COMPETITOR GROUPS

  • PADI Dive Center or Resort with 0-4 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Dive Center or Resort with 5-9 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Dive Center or Resort with 10-14 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Dive Center or Resort with 15+ MSD certifications during the 2018 period

Each competitor group listed above will be awarded one 1st place winner, for a total of four prize winners! In addition, you will receive a downloadable suite of tools to help you market the challenge to your students and students will have the chance to win a grand prize too! All students who earn the Master Scuba Diver rating from 1 August through 31 December 2019 will be automatically entered to win a dive vacation holiday.

Keep an eye out for more details and challenge registration via email and the PADI Pros’ Site coming soon!

The Individual Member Master Scuba Diver Challenge is Coming 1 August

Get ready for a friendly competition! Enter the 2019 Master Scuba Diver™ (MSD) Challenge from 1 August through 31 December 2019 and you could win your 2020 PADI® Membership renewal. You’ll also gain bragging rights and receive special recognition in PADI’s eNewsletter – Surface Interval.

MSD-Challenge

HOW TO WIN 

The PADI Instructors showing the most percentage growth in Master Scuba Diver certifications (as compared to the same time frame last year) will win. You’ll only compete against others in your competitor group:

COMPETITOR GROUPS

  • PADI Individual Members with 0 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Individual Members with 1 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Individual Members with 2-4 MSD certifications during the 2018 period
  • PADI Individual Members with 5+ MSD certifications during the 2018 period

Each competitor group listed above will be awarded one 1st place winner, for a total of four prize winners! In addition, you will receive a downloadable suite of tools to help you market the challenge to your students and students will have the chance to win a grand prize too! All students who earn the Master Scuba Diver rating from 1 August through 31 December 2019 will be automatically entered to win a dive vacation holiday.

Keep an eye out for more details and challenge registration via email and the PADI Pros’ Site coming soon!

PADI Dive Centers & Resorts will also receive an email about the PADI Retail and Resort Master Scuba Diver Challenge.

Career Opportunity: Regional Manager (New Zealand & Fiji)

We have a career opportunity available for a Regional Manager (New Zealand & Fiji). 

The Regional Manager will provide sales consultation and support for PADI Members in the region.  You will be a primary contact for PADI Members and provide localised service, support and liaison while supporting PADI’s goals for growth.  

We are seeking a PADI IDC Staff Instructor as a minimum (Course Director preferred) with at least 2 years’ experience as an active Instructor member. 

Appropriate citizenship, residency or visa with work rights relevant to the work location is essential.

To apply: Please send your CV to alison.vasek@padi.com.au

Applications close: 23rd July 2019

Keep Learning

These days you hear “never stop learning” so much it’s practically a cliché, but for good reason. Today technologies and methodologies evolve rapidly so that more than at any time in history, continuous education is crucial to staying informed and relevant in every field. More than just keeping up, you also need it to open new opportunities and directions by expanding your capabilities and qualifications. Even in our retirement years, data show that life-long-learners tend to be more socially engaged, and (with good diet and exercise) have significantly slower age-related brain function declines. You’ve may have heard about these benefits, but there are at least two other continuing education benefits you don’t hear about as much.

Scuba Divers - Coral Reef - Underwater

1. Discover and extend your passions. While we know what our passions are, life-long-learners know from experience that we often don’t know what they could be. A mild curiosity sometimes only hints at a deep, underlying interest waiting to emerge and grow. The only way to know is to pursue these, ideally through courses or programs that get you truly engaged. As an example, an instructor I know had a slight interest in cave diving. Almost on a whim though, he took a cave diver course and 20 years later, cave diving is still one of his primary, favorite underwater pursuits. If he’d decided that because he’s an instructor he didn’t need to keep learning, he’d have lost two decades of something he’s truly passionate about.

There’s another side to this, too. By continuing your education, you also learn what your passions are not. We’re usually pretty good at choosing things that interest us, but it’s not a waste when you miss the mark and learn about something that’s in the wrong direction because it redirects you to where your interests really lie. A diver I knew chose the search and recovery dive in the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course thinking he’d really enjoy finding and floating lost stuff. While the dive went fine and he did well, he learned that it really wasn’t for him. So, having never dived a dry suit, he did that dive next and that hit his hot button because diving dry is way more useful for his diving.

But, we’re not just talking about diver courses. What you learn in diving takes you beyond diving, and vice versa, if you just run with it. I know several divers who started with underwater photography, but as their love for the art blossomed, soon they were studying the dry side of imaging. Today they’re professional-level photographers above water as well as below. Flipping it around, many public safety divers start as police officers and fire fighters, then keep learning so they can take their expertise underwater when needed.

Public Safety Diver - Safety - Scuba Diver
Photo: Mike Berry

2. Share and pay forward. Public safety diving – a profession that helps solve crimes, save lives and bring closure after tragedy – demonstrates that continuing to learn isn’t just about you. Learning more is often part of giving more – directly or indirectly. If we train in diver rescue and CPR/first aid, we’re better able to help someone in serious emergency situations – diving and non-diving. Learn how to help people with physical or mental challenges dive, and you’re uniquely prepared to buddy with someone who has those needs. Take a course or courses in marine life survey techniques, debris collection, environmental science, wildlife resource management, coral restoration etc. (this can be a very long list), put what you learn into practice, and you become part of the solution for a cleaner and healthier world.

Qualify as a teacher and/or instructor in any of these areas, and you can help others help others with these kinds of courses. Add American Sign Language (or the sign spoken where you are), and you can teach people with hearing impairment challenges. You get the point – none of this happens if we don’t keep learning.

While continuing our education is more important than ever before, fortunately, in almost every endeavor it is also more accessible than ever before. It’s true in diving. You probably know you can start most PADI courses with a call, message or visit to your local PADI Dive Center and Instructor, and with many, just a click at padi.com. But, the life-long-learning door is wide open –in the modern world, the challenge isn’t finding, but choosing. Search “YOUNAMEIT courses” and you’ll almost always find multiple courses, programs and elearning opportunities to research further and pick from.

If you’re passionate about diving like I am, I’m sure you’ll keep learning about diving and the underwater world. Hopefully, your next course will uncover a new underwater passion or expand one you have now. But, please, don’t limit your learning to diver courses. You’re never too young or too old, so keep learning something to share and pay forward.

As Gandhi said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

The Unifying Power of Diving

It’s a wonderful thing just how diverse we humans are. We differ in skin color, gender, physical details, language, culture etiquette, clothing and customs, and these are just obvious differences above deeper ones, like values, emotions, beliefs and even how we think.

Bonaire Diver - Scuba Diver - Women In Diving

As the world shrinks, cultural differences and inherent tribalism increasingly cause friction, competition, bias, rivalries, prejudice, political discourse, war, social separation and other by-products, which is one reason intercultural communication is a rapidly rising, global priority. It studies effective, positive and constructive communication across cultures, customs, borders, languages and other variations in people groups. As it happens, diving is an effective, positive and constructive intercultural communication vehicle in at least three main ways (probably more).

1. Diving teaches us a common language. If you dive internationally, you may have experienced something like this: A diver points to two fingers at their eyes, then one finger in some direction, followed by a hand vertically at the forehead. Above water, they might have shouted, “¡Mira! ¡Tiburón!,” “देखो! शार्क!” or “봐봐요! 상어!,” and you wouldn’t understand. They told you, “Look! Shark!” and underwater you got it, regardless of what voice languages you do or don’t speak. As divers, we constantly communicate with formalized signals, improvised gestures and expressions. We don’t even need a common voice language for things like predive safety checks or to help each other back onto the boat, and we communicate clearly. This is not a small point because language is the fundamental – the very heart of understanding, interaction and respect between people. It is the basis for higher level thinking, and one of the strongest factors that brings cultures together.

2. Diving generates interpersonal experiences. Social psychologist Gordon Allport’s contact hypothesis says that interpersonal contact is one of the most effective ways to reduce prejudice (i.e., create understanding) between groups, and diving together can be a close, interpersonal contact. Increasingly, dive tourism puts us with dive professionals, buddies and others from other parts of the world – at some top dive destinations today, it’s common to hear three or more languages on deck. Diving not only gives us interpersonal contact through experiences shared, but through responsibility shared. When buddied and on group tours, we rely on each other to dive safely as a team, and to be there for each other if there’s a problem. After the dive, we post and share images together, sign logbooks, get ready to go again, etc. It’s difficult to do things together and depend on each other, and not come to know and understand each other, at least a little better.

3. We are an inclusive community united by common purposes. There’s a 4th century proverb, “The enemy of my enemy is my friend,” which applies very much to diving. Because we have a passion for the underwater world, anything that threatens it is our common enemy, and we unite against the threat. In the past few years alone, millions of divers around the world have come together to ban shark finning, preserve threatened species, restore coral, eliminate plastic waste and spread the healing power of diving. Against these threats and human needs, cultural differences fade because we’re in this together, and these are everyone’s problems.

Scuba Diver - Underwater - All Okay Signal - Bahamas

As divers, our messages and images crisscross the planet in social media, drawing others from all walks and places to these causes, and to diving too. Moreover, our cross-cultural diversity adds legitimacy to what we say: When millions of divers (and those we influence) raise their voices in every country, in every language, from every culture, to every government, it cannot be a regional bias, special interest or part of a political agenda. Japanese poet Ryunosuke Satoro put it, “Individually we are a drop. Together, we are an ocean.” Wise words – and fitting. The oceans are nature’s most powerful force.

Let’s not overstate things though. Diving cannot, by itself, bring about the intercultural communication and cooperation the world needs to rise against these global challenges. But, diving is absolutely a needed unifying force pushing back against a myriad of social forces that try to divide and defeat us (meaning everyone, not just divers). In my opinion, this by itself, is a reason to be a diver, and a reason to invite others into diving.

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO