PADI Instructor Examinations for April 2019

3-Apr-19 | Mabul, Malaysia

4-Apr-19 | Khao Lak, Thailand

6-Apr-19 | Bali, Indonesia

6-Apr-19 | Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka

8-Apr-19 | Moalboal, Philippines

8-Apr-19 | Lembongan, Indonesia

9-Apr-19 | Gold Coast, Australia

9-Apr-19 | Gili Islands, Indonesia

11-Apr-19 | Malapascua, Philippines

12-Apr-19 | Amed, Indonesia

13-Apr-19 | Sanya, China

13-Apr-19 | Bohol, Philippines

13-Apr-19 | Semporna, Malaysia

14-Apr-19 | Dumaguete, Philippines

20-Apr-19 | Phuket, Thailand

20-Apr-19 | Shenzhen, China

23-Apr-19 | Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

23-Apr-19 | Koh Tao, Thailand

26-Apr-19 | Koh Lanta, Thailand

27-Apr-19 | Jeju Island, South Korea

27-Apr-19 | Jakarta, Indonesia

Teaching Status

By Quality Management Consultant Don McFadden

Being a renewed PADI Member means having access to a vast array of benefits in areas such as educational, business, marketing, risk management, product support, live and recorded seminars & webinars, and superior year round support provided by the experience PADI staff located in offices all around the globe.

But what does renewing as a PADI Member mean when looking at it from a risk management perspective?

In addition to the benefits mentioned above, when renewing as a PADI Member there is an agreement which is made. Members agree to abide by the PADI Membership Agreement and License Agreement for PADI Members, and in return PADI authorises the member to act as a PADI Member, receive membership benefits and use PADI training materials for that coming year.

When a member’s membership lapses it means PADI has not documented the member agreeing to the PADI Membership Agreement and License Agreement for PADI Members for that upcoming year, therefore the member is not permitted to act as a PADI Member.

If a PADI Instructor tries to teach a PADI course while non-renewed they run several risks to themselves as well as their students. Throughout the membership year members are updated with the latest training standard changes which are often implemented to increase safety for students. Missing out on these implemented changes can mean you are missing out on critical information which may assist you in reducing the overall risk for students. 

So where does the instructor stand if an incident occurs resulting in injury or worse to a student of a non-renewed member? The level of competence of the instructor will always be taken into account, but why risk the chance that something has changed you were unaware of? The question you must ask yourself is “would a prudent dive instructor in the same circumstances have acted in the same way?” If they would answer collectively ‘No’ then you may be failing in your duty as a competent and reasonably prudent instructor.

What happens if the instructor teaching the course is not qualified to conduct the specific PADI training? An example would be an instructor teaching a PADI speciality diving course without the appropriate training. Taking students inside a wreck during a PADI Wreck Diver Specialty dive when you do not hold the Wreck Specialty Instructor rating yourself not reasonable and prudent behaviour. In the event of an incident serious questions would be asked by the authorities and by PADI about the instructor’s competence to undertake the training. So why take the risk? Always work within your limits and never agree to conduct a programme are not qualified to teach.

What about another scenario where a Divemaster or Assistant Instructor teaches Open Water students? Divemaster and Assistant Instructors are, of course, not authorised to teach the PADI Open Water courses nor have they received the necessary training which would prepare them to conduct the course. The roles a certified assistant may take during the Open Water course are outlined in the PADI Instructor Manual on page 53:

3. Instructor conducts and directly supervises all open water dives.

Exceptions — instructor indirect supervision:

• Certified assistants supervising student divers during surface swims to and from the entry-exit point and during navigational exercises, as well as when remaining with the class when the instructor conducts a skill such as an ascent or descent with a student or student team.

• Certified assistants guiding student divers (at a ratio of 2:1) on Dives 2-4 when exploring the dive site.

• Assistant Instructors evaluating dive flexible skills at the surface in open water and conducting air pressure checks underwater.

Acting outside of these limits places the Divemaster or Assistant Instructor in a precarious position. They are acting outside of established standards and if there was to be an incident could find themselves facing serious consequences.

The member would find themselves answering questions from the Quality Management team and face some Quality Management action, possibly punitive. Why risk it? The PADI Instructor Manual is our foundation document and the minimum qualification required to teach each programme and course is clearly defined within it. Make sure before you enter the water you know you are able to conduct the programme.

If you have any questions about these topics consult your PADI Instructor Manual or get in touch with your Regional Training Consultant or Quality Management team. If you ever have any concerns please do not hesitate to get in touch with us atqa@padi.com.au.

Ordering PADI Materials Online

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robin Bylund.

Have you ever wanted to order your Digital PADI Products online and receive them into your account with minutes? With our PADI Online Shopping Cart, you can now place your Digital PADI Product orders online, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and receive your products almost immediately into your account.  The PADI Shopping Cart was updated back in 2018, making it by far the fastest and easiest way to order any PADI Digital Products. So if you haven’t had the chance to try the PADI Shopping Cart, give it a try as it will save you a lot of time while eliminating any potential delays from traditional order forms or back and forth emails.

What Do You Need to Get Started?

  1. Your PADI store or PADI Pro login details.
  2. Access to internet and one of the following devices: computer, mobile or tablet.
  3. For payment you will also need Credit card or PayPal account .

What is the Fastest Way to Order?

The Fastest way to order is to use “Saved Carts” for your standard digital orders which will allow you to simply click “re-order”. This will process the order right away based on the products and quantities you have set up your “Saved Cart” with. The first time you do this, it might take an extra few minutes but once setup, it will take you no more than 1-2 minutes to place the same order again.

How Do You Set Up Your “Saved Cart”?

  1. Click “Account” in the top menu.

2. Scroll down and click on “Quick Order form”.

3. Enter the product code (1) and adjust quantities you wish (2) and click “Add item” (3). Once you entered all the products you wish to have for this specific cart.

4. Once you have clicked “add items” you will get to the “order summary” page, where you can see total costs etc. This is where you can “save cart” (1) meaning this will be a pre-set order that can be reordered with just a few clicks. Save the cart with an appropriate name and you can go directly to the “checkout” (4) for identical orders in the future. If you forgot to add an item you can “add item” (2). Here also If you wish to remove items from your order/ saved cart you can remove it and then update the order. Finally if you’re happy with the products and quantities you simply move on to “Checkout” (4).

5. After clicking on “Checkout” in picture above it will ask you what payment method you use PayPal or Credit Card. When selecting PayPal it will redirect you to PayPal to place payment with your PayPal account or if selected credit card it will bring you to the page where you can input your credit card details.

6. If you use Credit card did you know you can also save your Credit Card on file so that next time you order, you simply select “use saved credit card“. This will speed up your orders once again.  

Now let’s pretend that you have placed your initial order and a week down the line you need to go in and order again. Below I will show you in 2 easy steps how to process your order using your previously “saved cart”.

How To Access Your Saved Carts

  1. Accounts – Saved Carts

2. Cart – View Saved carts

When you have done one of the 2 options above, it will show you all your “saved carts”. In the example below, I have set up multiple carts for various products and order types. This way once you have setup the carts, your ordering will take less than a few minutes to process as the products you want are already there. All you need to do is adjust the quantities you need to order.

So you can either simply click “order” (1) which will bring you to the order summary. Here you can choose to checkout and pay or you can  “edit” the order (2).

How to Locate an Old Invoice

Another function that is often over looked is your invoice history. The shop online feature allows you to see any past invoices that have been invoiced or ordered from your Pro account. To find these invoices simple go to “Account” in the top menu bar on the front page, then look at the Order history section and click on “orders”.

Important Note: for physical orders outside of Australia please contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant for best practices in your region. Please double check this prior to placing an order as these are often available locally.

I hope this gives you a bit more of an idea of how easy it can be to order PADI materials on the shop online. I challenge you all to give it a try as it will not only save you time but will allow you to place an order online at anytime, with digital product orders arriving into your account within minutes of checking out.

If anything is unclear or if you need assistance with starting to use the shop online please contact you PADI Regional Training Consultant.

Make a Life

Divers - Topside - Boat Divers

How did you get into diving? Or more specifically, who got you into diving? You’re a diver either because someone took you by the hand and led you to an instructor, or you found an instructor who nurtured your interest. Maybe it was a bit of both or someone else helped you along, but no matter how you slice it, we’re all divers because someone shared diving with us. They opened the door, encouraged us and made us feel welcome. Even if we were already interested thanks to the internet, television, cinema or whatever, to some to extent (usually to a large one) diving was (and is) a gift.

Scuba Divers - Underwater - Descent Line

IMO, it’s a gift we should share. American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, “Give what you have. To someone, it may be better than you dare to think.” I added the emphasis because this absolutely describes diving. As I’ve said here before, diving reshapes lives, alters perspectives and changes attitudes. Thanks to this, some of us become teachers who help shape a rising generation that will preserve the seas. Others of us combat climate change and restore coral damage. Through diving we experience healing, and last year, the world watched divers spearhead a massive effort to save 12 boys and their coach from a flooded cave in Thailand. Longfellow was right; when we give diving by inviting others into our ranks, we are often giving far more than we imagine.

And, unlike many things today, diving is uncontroversial. People are hungry for enlightening experiences, new friendships and ways to contribute meaningfully. Diving is a gift because it’s not just an invitation into a wonderous world that feeds this hunger, but because it’s inclusive, not divisive. We become divers without swinging our political outlook, joining a cult or endorsing a new world order. It brings us together regardless of differences, which makes sharing diving so easy I’m astounded when divers don’t do it. But, as Lemony Snicket says in the children’s book Shouldn’t You Be In School?, “Hungry people should be fed. It takes some people a long time to figure this out.”

Wreck Diver - Shipwreck - PADI Wreck Diver

We don’t need to figure this out; we just need to make the effort to do it. When we wax eloquent about our dives at the water cooler, post underwater images on social media, update others on the latest AWARE event, etc., all we have to do is put it out there: “You’ll love it – come meet my instructor.” “Check out this link. Awesome underwater shots.” “How ’bout lunch? We can drop by my dive shop after.” If you’re already an instructor, it’s even easier: “What are you doing (whenever)? You can try it (or get started).” You get the idea.

English stateman Winston Churchill famously said, “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Or lives. Make a point of giving diving to others.

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

6 Top Tips to Help Dive Operators Reduce Marine Litter

Ocean - Plastic - Marine Litter

Guest Post Written By: Melissa Hobson, The Reef-World Foundation

It’s no secret that plastic pollution and marine debris is a huge problem threatening the health of our oceans. That’s why PADI is involved in an industry-wide initiative called Mission 2020, which aims to inspire dive-related businesses and charities to commit to reducing their plastic use.

PADI has pledged to lessen its dependency on packaging to minimise the plastic footprint of hundreds of thousands of divers each year. But what can you do as a dive operator to reduce plastic pollution and marine litter?

Here are a few top tips from the team at The Reef-World Foundation(international co-ordinators of Green Fins) to help you play your part in preserving the oceans you enjoy diving in and for future generations:

1. Organise Underwater Clean-ups
Marine litter is a huge problem but dive operators can lessen its impact not only by refusing single-use items, reducing waste and recycling but also by conducting Dive Against Debris® surveys or even organising underwater clean-up events.

It’s important to avoid damaging the environment in the process of removing any marine debris so make sure your divers maintain good buoyancy, watch their fins, make sure they don’t have any gauges trailing that might touch or damage the reef and don’t touch anything that isn’t trash. Have them work slowly and carefully as a buddy team with one person holding the trash bag and the other wearing gloves and collecting the trash. Divers will need to adjust their buoyancy throughout the dive – remember, as they pick up more rubbish, they are going to get heavier! It’s also a good idea to record data about the trash you collect (Project AWARE’s Dive Against Debris App). You can find a handy guide to organising underwater clean-ups here.

2. Ditch the Masking TapeUsing masking tape to indicate a full tank is a common practice in many dive schools. But have you ever thought about what happens to that tape once it’s been torn off the tank neck? Tape can easily become marine debris by blowing into the ocean. Why not make permanent, reusable caps for your scuba tanks? It’s really simple – all you need is some plastic hosing and good quality rope.

3. Think About LunchesWe all know diving makes you hungry – and there’s nothing like providing some tasty snacks for your guest’s surface interval. But have you ever considered how your quick bite might affect the ocean? Plastic-wrapped sweeties and refreshments served in disposable containers all add to the plastic problem. But it needn’t be that way – clients will appreciate your efforts to preserve the marine environment by serving fresh fruit, coconut pieces and snacks in reusable lunch boxes!

4. Bin It!
As well as reducing your waste, it’s important to make sure any trash that’s created during diving trips is disposed of responsibly. Make sure your dive shops and boats have adequate ashtrays and appropriately sized bins (with lids – the bin is no use if the trash is still swept into the ocean by the wind!) and, wherever possible, separate and recycle your rubbish.

5. Adopt the Green Fins Code of Conduct or Become a MemberGreen Fins is a global initiative, coordinated internationally by The Reef-World Foundation in partnership with the UN Environment, which protects coral reefs by ensuring environmentally friendly diving and snorkelling practices.

Dive and snorkel centres operating in active Green Fins locations can apply for membership by signing the membership form and pledging to follow the 15 environmental practices of the Green Fins Code of Conduct. Active members will then be trained, assessed and certified annually and provided with all the resources they need to reduce their environmental impact. If Green Fins is not available in your area, adopt the Code of Conduct voluntarily.

Individual dive guides can also become Green Fins certified by completing the Green Fins Dive Guide e-Course – whether or not their dive shop is a member.

Divers themselves can choose to book with Green Fins members as well as donating to support the development and implementation of Green Fins’ work to make coral reefs more resilient when faced with greater threats such as climate change.

Mission 2020 - Marine Litter

6. Make a Mission 2020 Pledge
Changing your business practices to reduce plastics is not just good for the ocean; divers care about the ocean and look for businesses who are making strides to protect marine life. So, better environmental practices will lead to increased customer loyalty, higher rates of return customers and great online reviews (which, in turn, attract more business). If you run a diver operator and are inspired to help improve the health of our oceans by reducing your plastic consumption, make a pledge to support Mission 2020.

Share Your Vision

Diver Underwater - Scuba Diver - School of Fish

It’s estimated that every two minutes, humanity takes more pictures than were taken in all of the 1800s. As of 2018, they say we shoot at least 1 trillion images annually – 2.7 billion daily or 1.9 million every minute, posting about 300 million daily.

As amazing as these numbers are, what I find more amazing is that just as these words found you amid the approximately 9-quadrillion-plus words humanity uses daily, the images you and I take as divers do not get lost amid the trillions of others taken. In fact, they are more visible than in the past.

This is because while image volume is skyrocketing, how we use imagery is expanding. Not that long ago, the average person shared crude (by modern standards) snaps as prints or a slideshow with a few friends, and relived memories now and again by flipping through them. Reaching more than a handful of people with stills or video was almost exclusively the domain of serious enthusiasts and professionals.

Scuba Diver Selfie - Women in Diving - Underwater Photography

But not anymore. Today we use mobile devices to capture about 90% of images, and imaging has grown into part of everyone’s communication. We all reach thousands-plus on social media. We can post in (or almost in) real time whenever we want, and our images transcend “pictures” because they’re messages sent to people with whom we have personal ties – that’s what gets your images (and words) through the staggering numbers to get seen, and it doesn’t end there. On the receiving end, your friends see them almost immediately and when they’re interesting and/or compelling, they broaden who you reach by reposting to others with whom they have personal ties. So, our imagery reaches more people, and it is more powerful because it is a universal communication that conveys our experiences, visions and perspectives across national borders and language barriers.

This is especially true for us divers. Thanks to its extraordinary ability to emotionally connect with the human experience of going into inner space, photography has always been close to the heart and soul of diving (the first underwater photos actually predate scuba). Today, divers easily snap images with color, sharpness and quality that the pros agonized to get in the 1960s and 70s. Applying these modern technologies to high end cameras and computer post-processing, today’s serious underwater shooters produce stills and video that were unimaginable, unimaginably difficult or even impossible two decades ago.

Crab - Underwater - Coral

All this means that whether you’re passionate about serious imagery, or just snapping casual shots (and we need both), your images have power. They can influence. You can use them to communicate with others about the oceans and underwater world at a time in history when it matters most.

Stills and video of coral, kelp forests and reef-wrecks show that the underwater world is beautiful, worth experiencing and worth saving – we need these, but our messages must be wider. Ugly, but important, shots of dead/broken coral, adrift plastic, a litter-strewn beach or a sea lion drowned in a ghost net remind people that we have some urgent, serious problems that threaten life on Earth. Divers in an AWARE underwater clean up, restoring coral and staging a save-the-sharks outreach show that divers care and are doing something about these problems. Before-during-after dive moments with buddies, video of an Advanced Open Water Diver student triumphantly mastering navigation, and shots of a physically challenged person, an elderly person and a youngster diving together show that diving forges friendships, teaches us about ourselves, and embraces everyone.

PADI Go Pro Evolution - Go Pro Contest - Underwater Photography

It’s often said that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” Whether it’s your mobile device, a mask-mounted GoPro or a pro-quality camera, as a diver your posted images can be worth more than that. The right image may be worth a thousand fewer kilos of plastic contaminating the seas. A thousand more sharks still alive. A thousand more divers shoulder-to-shoulder with us as the seas’ ambassadors and a force for good.

So please, shoot, post and share. The world needs to see what you and I see.

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

PADI/GoPro Evolution Video Contest Kicks Off

Go Pro - PADI - Contest - Evolution Contest

PADI® is partnering with GoPro to present the three-part Evolution video contest series, which will run through October 2019. Whether it’s a sunken ship in your favorite quarry, an unforgettable turtle encounter or a freedive over a vivid reef, you and your divers have a shot at winning valuable prizes as you show off your video and editing skills. Best of all, the contests are a chance to increase your business by offering specialty courses and camera sales.

The CAPTURE contest, which is open for entries from 15April – 30May, asks divers, who are at least 18 years old, to simply capture an amazing underwater experience; the second contest, EDIT, is open 1 July – 15 August and tests your editing skills with a series of clips provided by GoPro; the final contest, CAPTURE/EDIT, opens 16 September – 31 October and requires you put everything together – capturing and editing – into one awesome story.

The three contests are open to everyone – amateurs and pros alike – and, beyond just being fun, offer incredible opportunities to boost your business:

  • Teach underwater photography. While divers can get tips on how to capture and edit amazing underwater footage from GoPro professionals, consider cross promoting the contest with a PADI Digital Underwater Photographer specialty course. Either offer the specialty on request, or schedule a handful of courses throughout the duration of the contest period (essentially, all of 2019). When selling the Digital Underwater Photographer specialty, point out to your divers that they’ll likely be able to shoot footage during the course that they can then enter in the contest!
  • Consider other specialties. Digital Underwater Photographer isn’t the only specialty you can promote – there are a number of great courses that tie in nicely not just with the contest, but with digital underwater photography as well. Peak Performance Buoyancy is an obvious tie-in because peak buoyancy makes underwater photography more rewarding; Fish Identification teaches divers to identify fish and understand fish behavior better; and, the Boat Diver and Wreck Diver specialties can get divers to environments they may not have dived before, for exciting new encounters. What’s more, if your divers take enough of these specialties, they’re on their way to PADI Master Scuba DiverTM.
  • Sell the hardware. Finally, take this opportunity to sell more GoPro cameras and accessories, or if you don’t currently sell GoPro, consider adding them to you inventory. Only videos shot on a GoPro can be entered into the Evolution contest, so what better way of promoting the sale of GoPro cameras and accessories than by featuring them right next to information about the contests!

Registrations are now open for the CAPTURE contest – Enter Here

To help you promote the PADI/GoPro Evolution contest to your divers, there is a full range of marketing collateral and resources on the PADI Pros’ Site. Happy shooting!

Register Your Event for PADI Women’s Dive Day 2019

PADI Women's Dive Day - Women Diving - Underwater Diver

It’s that time of year again! Be a part of the fifth annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 20th July 2019.  PADI Women’s Dive Day was born of a desire to celebrate the incredible women in scuba diving, help close the unnecessary gender gap that still exists and encourage a more active female dive community to drive additional business for PADI Members.

So why not get your own PADI Women’s Dive Day event live and promoted well before the 20th July? Whether you plan a group dive, a learn to dive event, a picnic at the pool or something entirely of your own making, PADI Women’s Dive Day provides opportunities to meet new customers and build stronger relationships with your divers.

Register your event so that people can easily find it and join the festivities. You can also download a full range of promotional materials from the PADI Pros’ Site under the Marketing Toolbox section.

Register your event here

Contact your PADI Regional Manager or email marketing@padi.com.au if you have any questions.

PADI Instructor Examinations for March 2019

1-Mar-19 | Koh Phi Phi, Thailand

2-Mar-19 | Bali, Indonesia

2-Mar-19 | Nadi, Fiji

5-Mar-19 | Gili Islands, Indonesia

8-Mar-19 | Dumaguete, Philippines

8-Mar-19 | Kenting, Taiwan

10-Mar-19 | Koh Chang, Thailand

10-Mar-19 | Bangkok, Thailand

13-Mar-19 | Pattaya, Thailand

14-Mar-19 | El Nido, Philippines

15-Mar-19 | Goa, India

16-Mar-19 | Phuket, Thailand

16-Mar-19 | Lembongan, Indonesia

19-Mar-19 | Koh Tao, Thailand

20-Mar-19 | Manado, Indonesia

20-Mar-19 | Subic Bay, Philippines

20-Mar-19 | Cebu, Philippines

23-Mar-19 | Boracay, Philippines

23-Mar-19 | Phu Quoc, Vietnam

26-Mar-19 | Puerto Galera, Philippines

27-Mar-19 | Nha Trang, Vietnam

29-Mar-19 | Santander, Philippines

30-Mar-19 | Sydney, Australia

30-Mar-19 | Tioman Island, Malaysia

30-Mar-19 | Koh Lipe, Thailand

30-Mar-19 | Melbourne, Australia

10 Tips for PADI Instructors from the Quality Management Team

By Kim Ngan, Quality Management Consultant

This month we would like to share some terrific tips for new (and not so new) PADI Instructors.

1 – Use your PADI Cue cards

Ignoring your cue cards is a rookie’s mistake. Using a cue card does not make you less cool, but in fact it makes you look professional and well-prepared. The cue cards are made to support us to ensure we do not miss teaching any skills and we teach in the correct sequence. Further they assist us in presenting the performance requirements clearly which serves to assist us to teach the skill correctly and the student understand what they are expected to achieve.   

2 – Read your PADI Instructor manual – Don’t follow the crowd

Sometimes we question our understanding of PADI standards, don’t just listen to other instructors or follow the crowd, simply read your Instructor manual and find out the answer. The Instructor manual gives us guidance and reminds us what we should do and what we should not do. Thanks to today’s technology, we now have the PADI digital manual available in several languages so you may always find the latest version to download from the Pro Site.

3 – Read PADI’s Guide To Teaching

While the Instructor Manual lists required standards, PADI’s Guide to Teaching provides explanations, teaching techniques and suggested approaches to meet those standards. When preparing to teach a PADI course or program, particularly those you have never taught a course or don’t conduct courses on a regular basis, you will find the reminders in Guide to Teaching manual valuable in helping organize training sessions and dives. Be familiar with what information is in it will make it beneficial instructional tool and we can continue to use it throughout our teaching career.

4 – Keep a copy of Training Records

We should keep a copy of the training records, as they can play a key part in incidents and quality management situations. The training records prove the dive professional acted appropriately. Without them, it can be difficult to remember exact details of what happened. They are so important that we have will have another article later this year just about documentation. To download PADI training records go to your PADI pro account at PADI.com and download the forms under the section of Training essentials.

5 – Go onto the Pro site and utilize the resources

At the early stage of our diving career the primary reason for most of us to use the Pro site is to do a dive check or certify our student using the OPC. However the site offers much more than that.  Pro Site in fact is another powerful tool where PADI members can obtain a lot of different resources. Not only just the teaching tools or the marketing tools, but also tools for personal development. For examples, you may find out the dates and location for the next Instructor Update and sign up live Member Forums, seminars and webinars. You may also find the recordings if you have missed out any webinars. Pro Site also acts as a job finding platform for those who are looking for dive jobs around the world.  Check out the Risk Management recorded webinars as well: Pro development/BOD webinars/PADI Asia Pacific webinars. You will also find the Duty of Care, Guided dive and Rush Hour risk management videos at: 
Toolbox / Member / Quality Assurance – Duty of Care Resources.

6 – Have a set of digital manuals on your phone

We are in the Digital Age, most people have their own smartphone so there is no excuse not to have a set of digital manuals downloaded and be ready for your use if needed. One of the best things about your PADI digital manual is that they get updated regularly. PADI uploads the most up to the date version of the digital student manuals whenever it is available, so each time you refreshed your PADI library, the manuals in there will get automatically updated. You will be able to know what the students are reading and also have a better understanding of what they are going through.

7 – Attend LIVE member forum and Risk Management Seminars as much as possible

Have you attended any PADI live events yet? Do you know we have live Member forums and Risk Management Seminars in most region each year? Member forums bring us the Training Bulletin, a summary of the year and also what’s new in PADI. Risk Management seminars invites you to discuss trends in dive incidents and issues relevant to the safety or ourselves and our customers. These live events provide a great opportunity to meet other dive professionals and PADI staff.  It’s a great way to learn from each other!  

8 – Learn from a role model – Member of the Month and read the Undersea Journal

Wishing to find more tips and inspiration about how to become an outstanding PADI Instructor? Check out the winner of the Member of the Month on the Pro Site! It is one of the highest recognitions you can have as a PADI Instructor. The winner is selected from the extraordinary nominees from all around the globe. These PADI members are awesome role models. You may also find out more inspiring PADI members from the Undersea Journal in the section ‘Exceeding Expectations’. The UJ always features great stories of our PADI AmbassaDiver and all the articles there are written by experienced divers and PADI staff! There are plenty of places to look for great tips in leading divers and teaching great courses.

9 – Follow our E.A.P method to reduce Risk

Remember our first Surface Interval article and Webinar this year? We introduced a way to evaluate risk using a three-prong approach? It is calledEAP or – Environment- Activity- People.  To recap, we should always conduct an Environmental risk assessment as well as evaluate the type of the dives Activity itself, then assessing the People’s abilities and limitations. This helps us to use good judgement to make good decisions.

10 – Last but not least, talk to us!

We are here to help! Like you we are passionate about dive training and safety.  If you have any questions, just email us on qa@padi.com.au or pick up the phone and ring us on +61 2 9454 2888. We would love to hear from you!