PADI Instructor Examinations for March, 2018

02 Mar | Khao Lak, Thailand

03 Mar | Bali, Indonesia

06 Mar | Gili Islands, Indonesia

09 Mar | Kenting, Taiwan

09 Mar | Lembongan, Indonesia

10 Mar | Koh Chang, Thailand

10 Mar | Sydney, Australia

14 Mar | Pattaya, Thailand

14 Mar | Rarotonga, Cook Islands

15 Mar | El Nido, Philippines

17 Mar | Northland, New Zealand

17 Mar | Phuket, Thailand

18 Mar | Dumaguete, Philippines

18 Mar | Nadi, Fiji

20 Mar | Koh Tao, Thailand

21 Mar | Cebu, Philippines

24 Mar | Boracay, Philippines

27 Mar | Nha Trang, Vietnam

27 Mar | Puerto Galera, Philippines

31 Mar | Goa, India

31 Mar | Santander, Philippines

Your Air, Your Safety: A DAN Asia Pacific Safety and Awareness Campaign

If it wasn’t for scuba cylinders and surface-supply breathing apparatus that give us the possibility to breathe underwater, we wouldn’t be able to explore the underwater world. However, we also need to be vigilant that the gas we breathe is safe as there are various kinds of contaminations that can turn your underwater life support into poison.

After the relatively recent death of a scuba diver, it was found the level of Carbon Monoxide (CO) in his tank was over 450 times the accepted limit. He had filled his tank from a compressor which had, allegedly, not been properly maintained or regularly tested. As a result, the air being supplied was found to be very high in Carbon Monoxide (CO) levels.

This has prompted DAN Asia Pacific (AP) to launch a long-contemplated safety and awareness campaign in an effort to prevent a repeat of this incident.

Many divers only think about air problems from the perspective of running low or managing an out of air emergency, so DAN AP will work to create awareness for this very real issue. Contaminated gas can lead to perception changes and subsequent poor decisions, headaches, dizziness, nausea and, in extreme cases; it may cause unconsciousness and even death.

Unconsciousness from CO poisoning often occurs during or shortly after the ascent and can often lead to drowning unless the diver is rescued very quickly.

Over the coming months, DAN AP will be sharing information that is focussed on prevention and aimed at equipping recreational and professional divers with:

  • An understanding of the dangers of carbon monoxide and other contaminants
  • The ability to identify the symptoms associated with CO poisoning
  • First Aid and Treatment; and
  • Knowledge on how to reduce the risk of poisoning.

The main goal of the campaign is to prevent people from diving with contaminated breathing gas in the first place. We encourage you to share the information so we reach as many divers as possible.

Join the campaign via DAN AP’s Facebook Page, Twitter , Blog , and access resources via the Diving Safety section of the DAN AP website.

Let’s work together to ensure the air we all breathe when diving is safe.
Note: Safety campaigns are financed by DAN membership dues. Thank you to our members for their invaluable support.

Safe Diving.
The DAN Asia-Pacific Team

Originally posted by dan.org.

April Tips from the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management Team

In 2018 the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management team continues to bring you tips from PADI staff in the field on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities. This month we heard from Territory Director Thomas Knedlik.

 “As dive professionals working in an industry that is extremely fun and rewarding we easily gain self-esteem and confidence. With this self-satisfaction in mind, we need to ensure that we don’t fall into the trap of complacency, we must focus on the process instead of just the outcome; training divers to become comfortable and confident, not just meeting minimum requirements. By continuously evaluating, developing and adapting our own skills and knowledge we can ensure that diving remains fun, rewarding and enjoyable for generations to come.”

Thomas Knedlik

Teaching is one of the most rewarding things we can do. There is nothing better than seeing the look on a newly qualified PADI Diver radiating with pride and achievement. Sometimes however, this moment gets lost when we have to deal with pressure. This pressure could be to get the job done quickly or to skip certain skills because “they don’t really matter”, for example. This “one off” breach of standards could quickly build and occur time and time again.

Complacency builds on complacency, you see someone cut a corner, get lazy about how a skill is performed and before you know it others do it too. They copy you and we quickly go from a culture of safety to a culture of concern. We all want to be at the top of our game as instructors and stay there. We want our students to tell others how well the course went, how much fun they had, how they mastered their buoyancy and how much cool stuff they saw. All this comes through your dedication and commitment to your job. It should never be about getting someone through something but building an experience they will never forget.

On occasion we need to check ourselves. Remember why we chose this career. What is it we love doing and why? If you are getting bored with the same thing day in day out only you can make positive changes. Take a new course yourself, venture into a new challenge in diving. With PADI Freediver growing in popularity maybe this is something to expand into? Have you always wanted to try technical diving? Maybe now is a good time to give PADI TecRec a go. Regenerate your love for diving in a new and exciting way.

Review your own knowledge and keep up to date with Training Bulletins and read The Undersea Journal. Attend PADI webinars and seminars that are being held all across Asia Pacific. Ultimately don’t let complacency get the better of you. You want to keep it the fun and rewarding career you signed up for.

Until next time, we wish happy and safe diving for all.

Rebecca Wastall
Quality Management Consultant
PADI Quality Management

Updates for PADI Freediver Instructors and Trainers

We have some great news for PADI Freediver Instructors and Trainers we wanted to share with you.

First, as you have probably read already in the First Quarter 2018 Training Bulletin, you can now teach several PADI Standardised Specialties to your Freediver students. Additionally, you can also write your own Distinctive Specialties that PADI does currently not offer, such as Monofin, Safety Diver, Surf Survival or Mermaid Diver. Please see the relevant Training Bulletin for more information.

Secondly, we have also scheduled a PADI Freediver Update Webinar for current PADI Freediver Instructors and PADI Freediver Instructor Trainers! This webinar will provide you with the latest information in regards to the PADI Freediver program, current trends and PADI marketing efforts to support the program and our members.

The webinar is scheduled for Monday 26 March 2018 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM AEST. Please click below to register.

Register attendance

Last but least, we are pleased to announce the 2018 PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Course, scheduled from 21 May 2018 – 25 May 2018 in Cebu, Philippines. If you are interested in this course, please start the procedure by downloading the PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Course Fact Sheet. This will give you an idea of the requirements and procedures involved and will help answer some of the most frequently asked questions.

To apply for the course, download the PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Course Application Form. The application form should be submitted electronically to freediver@padi.com.au.

The deadline for submitting your application is 4 April 2018.

2017 Freediver Instructor Trainer Course Graduates

 

PADI Adaptive Techniques Specialty & Women’s Dive Day

Written by John Kinsella

It’s five thirty on a Costa Rican morning and Georgia King is talking to me about the PADI® Adaptive Techniques Specialty. It’s quiet, she says, before the rest of the family wakes. I can almost hear the tropical dawn chorus. Georgia is a PADI Platinum Course Director in Costa Rica and her time is precious, but she’s absolutely committed to helping people with disabilities benefit from diving and happy to share her wisdom. Georgia was an advisor during course development and has extensive experience and expertise. In fact, before we finish, Georgia has made another significant time and energy commitment: She’s decided to run an adaptive techniques workshop for PADI Women’s Dive Day.

Georgia’s commitment is such that since the program launched she has run two Adaptive Techniques Specialty courses right after two IDCs. It was a natural fit. “I think it’s fantastic to be able to incorporate the training with the IDC,” she says quietly. “It makes sense to integrate it naturally with the various course elements. New instructors coming out of the IDC are super excited because we’ve been talking about it. It inspires them to take that next step.”

I ask what she’d say to PADI Pros with no prior experience, who may never have thought of taking or teaching the Adaptive Techniques Specialty.

“Get involved,” she advises, pointing out that one of the major benefits, even if you are not immediately going out and teaching people with disabilities, is that it will open your mind to various teaching techniques and ways to approach all PADI programs. This can completely change the way you teach. “It really does open your eyes to a whole world of possibilities,” Georgia says. “Even in something as simple as demonstrating a skill in the skill circuit, you really just think differently. You are not set in one way of doing something. A lot of people think, ‘You have to do it this way.’ You know? You don’t.”

Georgia feels that a lot of people may be apprehensive about getting involved and offers this encouragement: “It’s kind of like the EFR® program when people worry about helping others. They don’t think they’ll be able to manage it. But everybody who has done the Adaptive Techniques Specialty is absolutely blown away and amazed by it. There’s more to it than people realize. Sure, it’s helping someone in a wheelchair, but that’s just a tiny part of it. The program talks about the attitudes, and how you treat people.”

And the confidence that insight brings opens up the most significant benefit of the Adaptive Techniques Specialty: It’s so rewarding for everyone. “Just giving people the opportunity, that’s one of the biggest things,” Georgia believes. “In any teaching there’s opportunity for reward, but sometimes I find more so with this. I shed tears after my first Discover Scuba® Diving experience with a guy who was born without legs. It completely amazed him how he felt underwater. He came up and just cried. I was so overwhelmed. It’s an amazing thing.”

Interview with Two PADI IDC Resorts Working With, Not Against Each Other

Sometimes working together instead of against each other yields huge benefits. A great example of this is Atmosphere Resort and Liquid Dive Dumaguete in the Philippines who are two very similar, but still very different dive resorts working constructively together.

Atmosphere, winner of the “Luxury Resort Award” in 2017, is a PADI 5 Star IDC Resort with numerous, similar accomplishments. Liquid Dive Dumaguete, also a PADI 5 Star IDC Resort, focuses on a different clientele and during the last couple of years have managed to build a big name within the dive industry.

What these two business have done is combined forces when it comes to their PADI Instructor Development Courses by creating ‘Instructor Development Philippines’ (IDP). Together they currently have 4 PADI Course Directors on staff as well as multiple PADI Master Instructors working in both resorts making sure that each and every one of their students gets the attention they need and require.

PADI Regional Manager Conny Jeppson contacted Gabrielle Holder (Owner/Course Director at Atmosphere Resort) and Tim Latimer (Owner/Course Director at Liquid Dive Dumaguete) to ask them a few question about how and why they decided to join forces.

Why did you make the decision to work together when conducting IDC programs?

GH/TL: We felt that there was a hole in the IDC market in the Philippines and we believed that by working together we could have a bigger impact by bringing in the expertise and knowledge from our different backgrounds. This combined with our separate marketing efforts and students being taught in the different dive centres also increases the combined reach.

Your program includes a unique ‘Learn to Teach’ element. Can you tell us a bit about that?

GH/TL: Our candidates have the opportunity to teach in two separate dive resorts which focus on separate markets and clientele. Candidates often do not know where they are heading after becoming an instructor. We wanted to offer two different venues through which they could conduct their first courses. This teaches them how to apply varying teaching styles to suit the student, and candidates work closely with our instructor teams to gain experience and teach a variety of PADI courses.

What else is unique about the program you offer?

GH/TL: We have four Course Directors in house at all times, with two being the owners of the resorts and Instructor Development Philippines. This means at any time we have the staff to give candidates individual attention whenever necessary. All candidates are signed up for IDC Online Study and they have individual tablets fully loaded with PADI materials during their IDC, ensuring they are well aware of how to function as a PADI Instructor in today’s digitalized world. We are also keen advocates of the environment, operating Project AWARE monthly clean-ups (Dive Against Debris) and a general environmental thinking throughout both resorts.

Do you have any memorable moments from the program thus far?

GH/TL: Every IDC is unique in its own way, but the main highlights are seeing candidates succeed in the future. We stay in touch with our candidate and we have seen them find their dream jobs and open their own dive centres, which is just fantastic.

How has coming together to run a joint IDC benefited your dive shop?

GH/TL: Working together has lead to benefits for both dive shops by growing our IDC reputation, including our ‘learn to teach programme’, as well as the reputation and brand awareness of both dive centres in general within the area.

What’s in store for the program going forward (e.g. growing, continuing to run etc.)

GH/TL: A venue purely for DM to IDC training to make us the ultimate experience in professional training; not just in the Philippines but also globally.

What advice do you have for any dive shop owner thinking about joining together for an IDC program?

GH/TL: It is very simple really. You need to offer something unique and find someone you are willing to work together with who has the same goals as you.

Thank you to both Tim and Gabrielle for taking the time to answer these questions and I hope that you, the reader, have some good ideas of how you and your neighbouring dive centers can start a similar cooperation be it in IDC’s, Freediving, TecRec or even normal courses working with different referral systems.

Conny Jeppson
PADI Regional Manager for the Philippines

March Tips from the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management Team

In 2018 the PADI Asia Pacific Quality Management team has been bringing you tips from PADI staff in the field on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities. This month we heard from PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa Territory Director, Rich Somerset.

“We are blessed with a career that puts us in contact with the ocean – and the ocean demands our respect. Treat her with respect and she will give you a lifetime of adventures, but underestimate her at your peril. Remember: be prudent in your decision making, put your students’ safety above your ego and – if in doubt – stay out.” – Rich Somerset

The Ocean is indeed a truly awesome place – the energy it holds, the life it creates, the life it supports, and the life it consumes. We are lucky enough to connect with it every time we enter the water. Even a simple swim can bring perspective to your day and put a running mind at ease. But like Rich says – the Ocean demands our respect.

A good dive instructor will know their limits and will stay well within them. This means having an even-handed grasp on the abilities of your students too. Good judgement must be applied in regards to water conditions, temperature, visibility, water movement, entries and exits, ability of participants, certified assistants available, your and your assistant’s personal limitations, and ratios etc.

You must ask yourself questions like:

  • “Am I familiar with this dive site?”
  • “Can I expect bad visibility or perhaps strong currents?”
  • “Can I provide adequate assistance to all divers in the group?”

With all things considered, you as the dive professional have the ultimate responsibility of making the go/no-go decision. If an incident occurs on the dive, the question will always be raised – “Should the divers have been in the water at that time, in that environment, in those conditions, with their experience?” If something goes wrong and it is shown that the diver should not have been in the water in the first place then you won’t have much chance of defending your decision to dive.

Rich couldn’t be more right when he says be prudent in your decision making, put your students’ safety above your ego and – if in doubt – stay out.” – This is the Quality Management department’s favourite part from Rich’s quote and we urge all PADI Members to live by this rule.

Until next time, we wish happy and safe diving for all.

Donny McFadden
Quality Management Consultant
PADI Asia Pacific