PADI’s Pillars of Change- A Force for Good in Koh Tao, Thailand

Written by PADI Territory Director Tim Hunt 

At  PADI  we  are  committed  to  supporting  social  and  environmental  efforts  through  PADI’s Pillars of Change. It  is  something  you’ve  heard  us  talk  about  during  our  member  forums,  general updates  and Social  Media  channels  –  but  we  are  also  putting  these words  into  action.  Around  the  globe  our  field  staff  are  spreading  the  message  to  members  and  to  potential  PADI  divers,  as  our  community  continues  to  grow.  Here  is  a  quick  look  at  the  efforts  of  Regional  Manager  Neil  Richards  and  Regional  Training  Consultant  Guy  Corsellis,  who  are  both based  in  Koh  Tao,  Thailand.

1

Marine Animal Protection  –  As  we all  know  a  healthy  ocean  is  vital  to  humanity. Therefore, PADI is taking steps to help divers become part of a positive solution to help impact and change our oceans. Guy and his son Iggy (PADI Divemaster Candidate) took this powerful message to the children from schools in their region, Koh Tao’s International Primary School and a local Thai Public School. After giving presentations to these children about the behavior of marine animals in their local underwater habitat, they were also able to provide some eco-friendly tips. By teaching and educating the children on how important our oceans, including the species within it, they will learn and help spread our message from an early age. We hope that as the future generation, they can influence change for generations to come.

2

Ocean Health  – With over 200,000 identified species in the oceans and millions more to discover, protecting our marine life biodiversity is critical. PADI works closely with organisations that strive to help and protect our oceans in a multitude of ways.  As our key partner in the environment for 25 years, Project AWARE  is one such organisation that is committed to keeping the natural balance in our aquatic world.  Project AWARE’s Community Conservation Officer, Jack Fishman, visited  Thailand to spread the word on Project AWARE’s Dive Against Debris Specialty Course, helping PADI dive centres engage with their community and tackle marine debris head on. He gave valuable insight into the role scuba divers play in highlighting the extent of the marine debris problem. The Project AWARE Shark Conservation Specialty Course was also taught to a large number of divers. PADI continues to support the education of our community into the importance of sharks and keeping marine ecosystems in equilibrium.

3

Healing and Wellness  – Becoming a diver is a life changing experience for a lot of people. It can drive career changes and provide transformations both mentally and physically. PADI’s Adaptive Techniques Specialty Course is a great example of this. It is a fantastic way for people to overcome adversity, illness or disability. Neil Richards and Guy Corsellis taught the specialty to the PADI Course Directors on Koh Tao to get them all motivated to support the transformation this speciality can bring. In a truly inspiring session, the PADI Course Directors showed great camaraderie as they worked together to develop different techniques to teaching. A course that was a real opener to some seasoned PADI professionals, will now become crucial to not only providing new divers the ability to fulfill their dreams, but also to inspire others along the way.

4

People + Community  – Very few people give more to a community than its emergency teams, ready  to help in an instant and putting others needs ahead of their own. Neil and Guy decided to give a little back when they took some of the nurses from Koh Tao’s newly opened hospital out for some fun under the water, as part of PADI Women’s Dive Day. The six nurses were introduced to a whole new world during a PADI Discover Scuba Diving Introductory Experience. By supporting the training of local people to foster sustainability, PADI continues to educate and support local communities to cultivate the protection mindset necessary for ocean health and marine animal protection.

 

For more information about the PADI Pillars of Change, please visit our website here.

#PADI4Change

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