Career Opportunity: Instructor Development Coordinator

We are have a career opportunity for an Instructor Development Coordinator to join PADI Asia Pacific’s Instructor Development team based in Sydney, Australia.

Seeking suitably qualified PADI Instructors, your role will involve providing the efficient organisation, coordination and support of all Instructor Development programs and activities. Key duties include maintaining event details, logistics and annual schedule of events and function as the primary contact person for inquiries from PADI Members and staff.

Further information: Visit My PADI Pros Site ‘Employment’ section or <click here> for the job description.

To Apply: Please send your CV to alison.vasek@padi.com.au

Applications close: 28th June 2019

You must have appropriate citizenship, residency or visa with the right to work in Australia.

Instructor Development Update -2019 PADI Asia Pacific

Bonaire - Open Water Diver - Scuba Instructor - PADI

Calling all PADI Course Directors and IDC Staff Instructors, join us for the 2019 Instructor Development Update. This update is mandatory for all PADI Course Directors intending to teach the revised Instructor Development Course (IDC). It covers the new IDC standards and curriculum including a review of the new IDC eLearning program and other associated tools. This includes the PADI Course Director Manual, evaluation tools and lesson guides, various workshops that are now part of the IDC and comprehensive evaluation training on the new criteria for Knowledge Development and Confined and Open Water.

The Instructor Development Update will include refreshments and lunch with the exceptions of Hong Kong and Seoul.  Hong Kong and Seoul will start mid to late in the afternoon and run through into the evening with refreshments and dinner.

Topics include:

  • Overview of the Revised IDC and New Materials
  • Standards and Curriculum Overview
  • Using Your Digital Material
  • Evaluation Training – Knowledge Development
  • Evaluation Training – Confined and Open Water

Registration will be available online soon. In the meantime we suggest you select your preferred venue from the options below and secure the date in your calendar.

Instructor Development Update schedule:

Date Location Time Venue
14 Sep Bali, Indonesia 9:00 – 16:00 Swiss-Belresort Watu Jimbar
16 Sep Cairns, Australia 9:00 – 16:00 Holiday Inn Esplanade
18 Sep Sydney, Australia 9:00 – 16:00 Stamford Airport Hotel
25 Sep Auckland, New Zealand 9:00 – 16:00 Novotel Auckland Airport
1 Oct Koh Tao, Thailand 9:00 – 16:00 Regal Resort
3 Oct Phuket, Thailand 9:00 – 16:00 Alpina Phuket Nalina Resort
5 Oct Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 9:00 – 16:00 Holiday Inn Glenmarie
10 Oct Manila, Philippines 9:00 – 16:00 TBA
12 Oct Cebu, Philippines 9:00 – 16:00 Pacific Cebu Resort
15 Oct Hong Kong 15:00 – 22:00 Cityview Hotel
17 Oct Shanghai, China 9:00 – 16:00 Intercontinental National Conference Centre
19 Oct Taipei, Taiwan 9:00 – 16:00 The Howard Hotel
4 Nov Jeju, South Korea 9:00 – 16:00 Bareve Hotel Jeju
5 Nov Seoul, South Korea 15:00 – 22:00 Olympic Parktel

Frequent Trainer Programme discounts apply to the CD Update programme fee. A comprehensive materials package is available for purchase at a very favourable price. The package includes materials required for conducting the PADI Instructor level courses and the new digital IDC Crewpak with IDC eLearning.

For more information contact PADI Asia Pacific Instructor Development atinstdev@padi.com.au or any member of the PADI Asia Pacific Instructor Development department team.

We look forward to seeing you there!

PADI Business Management Program Auckland, New Zealand

PADI Business Management Program

Join us on 28th August 2019 for our PADI Business Management Program in Auckland.

This new program will encourage you to think critically and creatively about management practice. You will gain an all-round understanding of how dive businesses and managers should function in a domestic environment while also developing analytical, problem solving and strategic planning skills that are attractive within the dive industry. The PADI Business Management Program will equip PADI professionals with the core knowledge and skills necessary to operate a cutting edge PADI dive business.

Led by industry experts, and with interactive presentations ranging from pricing strategy to store layout and staff management, this is an essential program for PADI Dive Store stakeholders aiming to raise the bar and increase turnover and profit in 2019.

The PADI Business Management Program in Asia Pacific will include the below presentations in 2019.

Attracting loyal customers

  • Elements of a Successful Website
  • Social Media and Video

Closing a profitable sale

  • Staff Training
  • Selling at a Profit
  • Great Customer Service

Bonus – Early Bird Offer & 4th Attendee Free

Register before 17th July to receive AUD $20 off the cost of your registration. Plus, with every third paid attendee, you will receive a fourth free. So get in quick and register your spot today!

Register Now

If you have further questions please contact alison.hush@padi.com.au or your PADI Regional Manager.

View dates and locations for additional PADI Business Management Programs in 2019 on the PADI Pros blog.

Instructor Use of Cameras During PADI Discover Scuba Diving and Open Water Diver Courses

Hawaii - Underwater Photography - Instructor and Student - PADI Scuba Divers

Written by Regional Training Consultant, Guy Corsellis

Underwater photography is an art form and an activity enjoyed by many of us. Some of us use photography and film simply for capturing souvenirs whilst others use it for recording data. As a PADI Instructor you may wish to engage in underwater photography activities whilst teaching which may be acceptable in some teaching situations. However, the PADI Instructor is still required to continually observe their divers with only the brief, periodic interruptions needed to lead the dive and provide assistance to individual divers, as required by PADI standards.

We do need to make a clear distinction of what is or isn’t allowed while conducting a PADI Discover Scuba Diving (DSD) or Open Water Diver course. Whilst conducting a PADI DSD, the standard is very clear. As you will find under the Supervision section from the PADI Discover Scuba Diving Instructor Guide, it clearly states: Do not engage in any other activities, such as taking photographs or video, while supervising participants. This standard was also reinforced in the 4th Quarter Training Bulletin 2012. While this standard has not been specified in the PADI Open Water Diver course, as PADI Instructors we still need to apply good judgment to increase and maintain diver safety without ever jeopardizing our student divers.

In the 4th Quarter Training Bulletin from 2005 we published an article about Student Diver-Centered Open Water Dives:

Training Bulletin - Student Diver-Centered Open Water Dives

During Open Water training dives, as the Instructor, you carry the responsibility to observe and evaluate each student diver’s performance. Participating in other activities during open water training dives detracts from your primary focus and responsibility. Underwater, if you are taking photographs, videotaping, mapping, searching, collecting or doing anything not directly related to the dive’s training objectives, you are not providing the direct supervision that student divers deserve or may need.  Please be aware that taking photos during a course (in particular an entry level course) may take your attention off the students.

From a risk management point of view as you will no doubt be aware, dive professionals are always advised to err on the side of caution. This is not only the safest option for all involved but also the best defence, should something go terribly wrong on the dive and the matter is taken to court. As a PADI Instructor, this is something you always need to bear in mind when you need to ‘make the call’. Make conservative judgment calls and always err on the side of caution. If student divers lack comfort and confidence, I strongly recommend that you only focus on the wellbeing of your student divers and not task load yourself with other activities. As stated in our Member Code of Practice, “As a PADI Member, you agree to the following: Put the safety of diving clients and students as your first priority and responsibility!”

Please don’t forget to have fun with your student divers and enjoy yourselves!

If you have any further questions, please email your Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au

PADI Business Management Program Sydney, Australia

PADI Business Management Program

Join us on 30th July 2019 for our first ever PADI Business Management Program in Sydney.

This new program will encourage you to think critically and creatively about management practice. You will gain an all-round understanding of how dive businesses and managers should function in a domestic environment while also developing analytical, problem solving and strategic planning skills that are attractive within the dive industry. The PADI Business Management Program will equip PADI professionals with the core knowledge and skills necessary to operate a cutting edge PADI dive business.

Led by industry experts, and with interactive presentations ranging from pricing strategy to store layout and staff management, this is an essential program for PADI Dive Store stakeholders aiming to raise the bar and increase turnover and profit in 2019.

The PADI Business Management Program in Asia Pacific will include the below presentations in 2019.

Attracting loyal customers

  • Elements of a Successful Website
  • Social Media and Video

Closing a profitable sale

  • Staff Training
  • Selling at a Profit
  • Great Customer Service

Bonus – Early Bird Offer & 4th Attendee Free

Register before 18th June to receive AUD $20 off the cost of your registration. Plus, with every third paid attendee, you will receive a fourth free. So get in quick and register your spot today!

Register Now

If you have further questions please contact alison.hush@padi.com.au or your PADI Regional Manager.

View dates and locations for additional PADI Business Management Programs in 2019 on the PADI Pros blog.

PADI Instructor Examinations for April 2019

3-Apr-19 | Mabul, Malaysia

4-Apr-19 | Khao Lak, Thailand

6-Apr-19 | Bali, Indonesia

6-Apr-19 | Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka

8-Apr-19 | Moalboal, Philippines

8-Apr-19 | Lembongan, Indonesia

9-Apr-19 | Gold Coast, Australia

9-Apr-19 | Gili Islands, Indonesia

11-Apr-19 | Malapascua, Philippines

12-Apr-19 | Amed, Indonesia

13-Apr-19 | Sanya, China

13-Apr-19 | Bohol, Philippines

13-Apr-19 | Semporna, Malaysia

14-Apr-19 | Dumaguete, Philippines

20-Apr-19 | Phuket, Thailand

20-Apr-19 | Shenzhen, China

23-Apr-19 | Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

23-Apr-19 | Koh Tao, Thailand

26-Apr-19 | Koh Lanta, Thailand

27-Apr-19 | Jeju Island, South Korea

27-Apr-19 | Jakarta, Indonesia

Teaching Status

By Quality Management Consultant Don McFadden

Being a renewed PADI Member means having access to a vast array of benefits in areas such as educational, business, marketing, risk management, product support, live and recorded seminars & webinars, and superior year round support provided by the experience PADI staff located in offices all around the globe.

But what does renewing as a PADI Member mean when looking at it from a risk management perspective?

In addition to the benefits mentioned above, when renewing as a PADI Member there is an agreement which is made. Members agree to abide by the PADI Membership Agreement and License Agreement for PADI Members, and in return PADI authorises the member to act as a PADI Member, receive membership benefits and use PADI training materials for that coming year.

When a member’s membership lapses it means PADI has not documented the member agreeing to the PADI Membership Agreement and License Agreement for PADI Members for that upcoming year, therefore the member is not permitted to act as a PADI Member.

If a PADI Instructor tries to teach a PADI course while non-renewed they run several risks to themselves as well as their students. Throughout the membership year members are updated with the latest training standard changes which are often implemented to increase safety for students. Missing out on these implemented changes can mean you are missing out on critical information which may assist you in reducing the overall risk for students. 

So where does the instructor stand if an incident occurs resulting in injury or worse to a student of a non-renewed member? The level of competence of the instructor will always be taken into account, but why risk the chance that something has changed you were unaware of? The question you must ask yourself is “would a prudent dive instructor in the same circumstances have acted in the same way?” If they would answer collectively ‘No’ then you may be failing in your duty as a competent and reasonably prudent instructor.

What happens if the instructor teaching the course is not qualified to conduct the specific PADI training? An example would be an instructor teaching a PADI speciality diving course without the appropriate training. Taking students inside a wreck during a PADI Wreck Diver Specialty dive when you do not hold the Wreck Specialty Instructor rating yourself not reasonable and prudent behaviour. In the event of an incident serious questions would be asked by the authorities and by PADI about the instructor’s competence to undertake the training. So why take the risk? Always work within your limits and never agree to conduct a programme are not qualified to teach.

What about another scenario where a Divemaster or Assistant Instructor teaches Open Water students? Divemaster and Assistant Instructors are, of course, not authorised to teach the PADI Open Water courses nor have they received the necessary training which would prepare them to conduct the course. The roles a certified assistant may take during the Open Water course are outlined in the PADI Instructor Manual on page 53:

3. Instructor conducts and directly supervises all open water dives.

Exceptions — instructor indirect supervision:

• Certified assistants supervising student divers during surface swims to and from the entry-exit point and during navigational exercises, as well as when remaining with the class when the instructor conducts a skill such as an ascent or descent with a student or student team.

• Certified assistants guiding student divers (at a ratio of 2:1) on Dives 2-4 when exploring the dive site.

• Assistant Instructors evaluating dive flexible skills at the surface in open water and conducting air pressure checks underwater.

Acting outside of these limits places the Divemaster or Assistant Instructor in a precarious position. They are acting outside of established standards and if there was to be an incident could find themselves facing serious consequences.

The member would find themselves answering questions from the Quality Management team and face some Quality Management action, possibly punitive. Why risk it? The PADI Instructor Manual is our foundation document and the minimum qualification required to teach each programme and course is clearly defined within it. Make sure before you enter the water you know you are able to conduct the programme.

If you have any questions about these topics consult your PADI Instructor Manual or get in touch with your Regional Training Consultant or Quality Management team. If you ever have any concerns please do not hesitate to get in touch with us atqa@padi.com.au.

Ordering PADI Materials Online

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robin Bylund.

Have you ever wanted to order your Digital PADI Products online and receive them into your account with minutes? With our PADI Online Shopping Cart, you can now place your Digital PADI Product orders online, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and receive your products almost immediately into your account.  The PADI Shopping Cart was updated back in 2018, making it by far the fastest and easiest way to order any PADI Digital Products. So if you haven’t had the chance to try the PADI Shopping Cart, give it a try as it will save you a lot of time while eliminating any potential delays from traditional order forms or back and forth emails.

What Do You Need to Get Started?

  1. Your PADI store or PADI Pro login details.
  2. Access to internet and one of the following devices: computer, mobile or tablet.
  3. For payment you will also need Credit card or PayPal account .

What is the Fastest Way to Order?

The Fastest way to order is to use “Saved Carts” for your standard digital orders which will allow you to simply click “re-order”. This will process the order right away based on the products and quantities you have set up your “Saved Cart” with. The first time you do this, it might take an extra few minutes but once setup, it will take you no more than 1-2 minutes to place the same order again.

How Do You Set Up Your “Saved Cart”?

  1. Click “Account” in the top menu.

2. Scroll down and click on “Quick Order form”.

3. Enter the product code (1) and adjust quantities you wish (2) and click “Add item” (3). Once you entered all the products you wish to have for this specific cart.

4. Once you have clicked “add items” you will get to the “order summary” page, where you can see total costs etc. This is where you can “save cart” (1) meaning this will be a pre-set order that can be reordered with just a few clicks. Save the cart with an appropriate name and you can go directly to the “checkout” (4) for identical orders in the future. If you forgot to add an item you can “add item” (2). Here also If you wish to remove items from your order/ saved cart you can remove it and then update the order. Finally if you’re happy with the products and quantities you simply move on to “Checkout” (4).

5. After clicking on “Checkout” in picture above it will ask you what payment method you use PayPal or Credit Card. When selecting PayPal it will redirect you to PayPal to place payment with your PayPal account or if selected credit card it will bring you to the page where you can input your credit card details.

6. If you use Credit card did you know you can also save your Credit Card on file so that next time you order, you simply select “use saved credit card“. This will speed up your orders once again.  

Now let’s pretend that you have placed your initial order and a week down the line you need to go in and order again. Below I will show you in 2 easy steps how to process your order using your previously “saved cart”.

How To Access Your Saved Carts

  1. Accounts – Saved Carts

2. Cart – View Saved carts

When you have done one of the 2 options above, it will show you all your “saved carts”. In the example below, I have set up multiple carts for various products and order types. This way once you have setup the carts, your ordering will take less than a few minutes to process as the products you want are already there. All you need to do is adjust the quantities you need to order.

So you can either simply click “order” (1) which will bring you to the order summary. Here you can choose to checkout and pay or you can  “edit” the order (2).

How to Locate an Old Invoice

Another function that is often over looked is your invoice history. The shop online feature allows you to see any past invoices that have been invoiced or ordered from your Pro account. To find these invoices simple go to “Account” in the top menu bar on the front page, then look at the Order history section and click on “orders”.

Important Note: for physical orders outside of Australia please contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant for best practices in your region. Please double check this prior to placing an order as these are often available locally.

I hope this gives you a bit more of an idea of how easy it can be to order PADI materials on the shop online. I challenge you all to give it a try as it will not only save you time but will allow you to place an order online at anytime, with digital product orders arriving into your account within minutes of checking out.

If anything is unclear or if you need assistance with starting to use the shop online please contact you PADI Regional Training Consultant.

Make a Life

Divers - Topside - Boat Divers

How did you get into diving? Or more specifically, who got you into diving? You’re a diver either because someone took you by the hand and led you to an instructor, or you found an instructor who nurtured your interest. Maybe it was a bit of both or someone else helped you along, but no matter how you slice it, we’re all divers because someone shared diving with us. They opened the door, encouraged us and made us feel welcome. Even if we were already interested thanks to the internet, television, cinema or whatever, to some to extent (usually to a large one) diving was (and is) a gift.

Scuba Divers - Underwater - Descent Line

IMO, it’s a gift we should share. American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, “Give what you have. To someone, it may be better than you dare to think.” I added the emphasis because this absolutely describes diving. As I’ve said here before, diving reshapes lives, alters perspectives and changes attitudes. Thanks to this, some of us become teachers who help shape a rising generation that will preserve the seas. Others of us combat climate change and restore coral damage. Through diving we experience healing, and last year, the world watched divers spearhead a massive effort to save 12 boys and their coach from a flooded cave in Thailand. Longfellow was right; when we give diving by inviting others into our ranks, we are often giving far more than we imagine.

And, unlike many things today, diving is uncontroversial. People are hungry for enlightening experiences, new friendships and ways to contribute meaningfully. Diving is a gift because it’s not just an invitation into a wonderous world that feeds this hunger, but because it’s inclusive, not divisive. We become divers without swinging our political outlook, joining a cult or endorsing a new world order. It brings us together regardless of differences, which makes sharing diving so easy I’m astounded when divers don’t do it. But, as Lemony Snicket says in the children’s book Shouldn’t You Be In School?, “Hungry people should be fed. It takes some people a long time to figure this out.”

Wreck Diver - Shipwreck - PADI Wreck Diver

We don’t need to figure this out; we just need to make the effort to do it. When we wax eloquent about our dives at the water cooler, post underwater images on social media, update others on the latest AWARE event, etc., all we have to do is put it out there: “You’ll love it – come meet my instructor.” “Check out this link. Awesome underwater shots.” “How ’bout lunch? We can drop by my dive shop after.” If you’re already an instructor, it’s even easier: “What are you doing (whenever)? You can try it (or get started).” You get the idea.

English stateman Winston Churchill famously said, “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Or lives. Make a point of giving diving to others.

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

6 Top Tips to Help Dive Operators Reduce Marine Litter

Ocean - Plastic - Marine Litter

Guest Post Written By: Melissa Hobson, The Reef-World Foundation

It’s no secret that plastic pollution and marine debris is a huge problem threatening the health of our oceans. That’s why PADI is involved in an industry-wide initiative called Mission 2020, which aims to inspire dive-related businesses and charities to commit to reducing their plastic use.

PADI has pledged to lessen its dependency on packaging to minimise the plastic footprint of hundreds of thousands of divers each year. But what can you do as a dive operator to reduce plastic pollution and marine litter?

Here are a few top tips from the team at The Reef-World Foundation(international co-ordinators of Green Fins) to help you play your part in preserving the oceans you enjoy diving in and for future generations:

1. Organise Underwater Clean-ups
Marine litter is a huge problem but dive operators can lessen its impact not only by refusing single-use items, reducing waste and recycling but also by conducting Dive Against Debris® surveys or even organising underwater clean-up events.

It’s important to avoid damaging the environment in the process of removing any marine debris so make sure your divers maintain good buoyancy, watch their fins, make sure they don’t have any gauges trailing that might touch or damage the reef and don’t touch anything that isn’t trash. Have them work slowly and carefully as a buddy team with one person holding the trash bag and the other wearing gloves and collecting the trash. Divers will need to adjust their buoyancy throughout the dive – remember, as they pick up more rubbish, they are going to get heavier! It’s also a good idea to record data about the trash you collect (Project AWARE’s Dive Against Debris App). You can find a handy guide to organising underwater clean-ups here.

2. Ditch the Masking TapeUsing masking tape to indicate a full tank is a common practice in many dive schools. But have you ever thought about what happens to that tape once it’s been torn off the tank neck? Tape can easily become marine debris by blowing into the ocean. Why not make permanent, reusable caps for your scuba tanks? It’s really simple – all you need is some plastic hosing and good quality rope.

3. Think About LunchesWe all know diving makes you hungry – and there’s nothing like providing some tasty snacks for your guest’s surface interval. But have you ever considered how your quick bite might affect the ocean? Plastic-wrapped sweeties and refreshments served in disposable containers all add to the plastic problem. But it needn’t be that way – clients will appreciate your efforts to preserve the marine environment by serving fresh fruit, coconut pieces and snacks in reusable lunch boxes!

4. Bin It!
As well as reducing your waste, it’s important to make sure any trash that’s created during diving trips is disposed of responsibly. Make sure your dive shops and boats have adequate ashtrays and appropriately sized bins (with lids – the bin is no use if the trash is still swept into the ocean by the wind!) and, wherever possible, separate and recycle your rubbish.

5. Adopt the Green Fins Code of Conduct or Become a MemberGreen Fins is a global initiative, coordinated internationally by The Reef-World Foundation in partnership with the UN Environment, which protects coral reefs by ensuring environmentally friendly diving and snorkelling practices.

Dive and snorkel centres operating in active Green Fins locations can apply for membership by signing the membership form and pledging to follow the 15 environmental practices of the Green Fins Code of Conduct. Active members will then be trained, assessed and certified annually and provided with all the resources they need to reduce their environmental impact. If Green Fins is not available in your area, adopt the Code of Conduct voluntarily.

Individual dive guides can also become Green Fins certified by completing the Green Fins Dive Guide e-Course – whether or not their dive shop is a member.

Divers themselves can choose to book with Green Fins members as well as donating to support the development and implementation of Green Fins’ work to make coral reefs more resilient when faced with greater threats such as climate change.

Mission 2020 - Marine Litter

6. Make a Mission 2020 Pledge
Changing your business practices to reduce plastics is not just good for the ocean; divers care about the ocean and look for businesses who are making strides to protect marine life. So, better environmental practices will lead to increased customer loyalty, higher rates of return customers and great online reviews (which, in turn, attract more business). If you run a diver operator and are inspired to help improve the health of our oceans by reducing your plastic consumption, make a pledge to support Mission 2020.