PADI-Attended Dive Expos in 2019

Attending Dive Expos can provide PADI Dive Shops with a vast array of opportunities to meet and engage with current and potential divers. It is also a fantastic way to learn about and trial new PADI products, meet with PADI staff and network with fellow PADI Professionals.

PADI will be participating in numerous consumer dive expos throughout 2019. The primary goal of PADI’s attendance is to assist PADI Dive Centres and Resorts promote PADI courses and the PADI brand. In 2018, PADI Dive Shops collectively sold 35% more PADI courses at dive shows in Asia Pacific than the previous year and we look forward to another successful year in 2019.

PADI Member Forums, seminars and PADI Business Academies are also often arranged to coincide with dive expos.

PADI will be exhibiting at the following Dive Expos in 2019.

ISPO Beijing 16-19 January 2019 Beijing, China
Korean Underwater Sports (KUSPO) 28 February – 3 March 2019 Seoul, South Korea
Asia Dive Expo (ADEX) Singapore 11-14 April 2019 Singapore
DRT Shanghai 12-14 April 2019 Shanghai, China
Malaysia International Dive Expo (MIDE) 3-5 May 2019 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Thailand Dive Expo (TDEX) 16-19 May 2019 Bangkok, Thailand
Asia Dive Expo (ADEX) China TBA Beijing, China

*Please note this list is subject to change without notice.

Read about some of the things you can do to make your exhibition a success in order to reap the benefits of attending. You should also contact your PADI Regional Manager or the PADI Marketing team to enquire about any support you may be eligible for, including marketing collateral and promotional offers.

In the event that PADI is not attending an expo, additional support will be offered to assist exhibiting PADI Members with their marketing efforts.

PADI Asia Pacific looks forward to assisting you with your dive show attendance and other events in 2019.

PADI’s Mission 2020 Pledge: Join Us!

PADI Mission 2020 - PADI - Mission - 2020

PADI’s long-standing commitment to ocean conservation began more than 25 years ago with the formation of Project AWARE® Foundation. In 2017, the PADI Pillars of Change were introduced to increase awareness of issues affecting our ocean communities, and to mobilize PADI Professionals and divers to act together as a catalyst for positive change. Now, the PADI organization is integrating the Mission 2020 effort to reduce plastics in the ocean into its overall commitment to ocean health and corporate citizenship ethos.

Aligning with PADI’s belief that greater change can be affected when working together, Mission 2020 is a collection of pledges from organizations within the diving community to change business practices to protect and preserve the ocean for the future. With a primary focus on single-use plastics, the project sets ambitious targets of changes to be made before World Oceans Day 2020.

PADI’s Mission 2020 Pledge

As PADI moves towards a fully integrated and digital learning system, we will lessen our dependency on plastics and packaging, thereby mitigating the plastic footprint of PADI Professionals and the million divers certified each year. To broaden our impact even further, PADI is committed to rallying our 6,600 Dive Centers and Resorts to reduce their use of single-use plastics by the year 2020. We invite everyone to make a pledge and to change their business practices in support of a clean and healthy ocean.

“We are passionate about creating a preferred view of the future in healthier oceans. We have a strong legacy of environmental conservation behind us and a robust roadmap for continued progress that will drive our force for good responsibility well into the future. This is the foundation of PADI’s Mission 2020 pledge, and it is our hope that this project will inspire the PADI community to make immediate commitments that will lead to lasting change.’ – Drew Richardson, President and CEO of PADI Worldwide

Why You Should Make a 2020 Commitment

It’s good for the planet – Changing your business practices to reduce plastics is good for the ocean and good for us too. Let’s protect the places we love to dive and make sure they are healthy for future generations.

It will enhance your business – Consumers are proud to attach themselves to a business with purpose. Show your customers that you care about the ocean and they will reward you with their loyalty.

It’s good for the dive industry – If we come together as an industry to protect our ocean planet, we set a good example for other businesses to follow. If a clean, healthy ocean is our goal, we need all the help we can get.

Plastic - Reef - Ocean - Plastic on Reef

PADI’s Mission 2020 pledge to reduce plastic with help restore ocean health. Join us in protecting the underwater world we love.

Impactful Ways to Reduce Your Plastic Use

  •  Prevent debris from getting into the ocean! Remove single use plastics like water bottles, plastic bags and plastic cups from your shop and dive boats.
  • Work with your local community to organize joint beach and underwater clean-up events. This effort brings awareness to everyone about how individual behaviors positively impact our environment.
  • Set monthly and yearly clean up goals for your local dive sites. Log the debris on the Project AWARE Dive Against Debris® App to contribute to data collection that could influence new ocean-friendly policies.
  • Protect your local waters and Adopt a Dive Site™. It’s the ideal way to engage in ongoing, local protection and monitoring of our underwater playgrounds.
  • Carry sustainably made merchandise in your dive center or resort. Make sure tee shirts, hoodies and other branded goods come from eco-friendly suppliers and are made from non-plastic materials or from recycled plastic fibers.
  • Make the switch to PADI eLearning® and improve your carbon footprint. Going digital reduces production of plastic materials and removes the need for shipping.

Make a Mission 2020 Pledge

All members of the dive community are encouraged to make a Mission 2020 pledge. And what a great time to align your pledge with your 2019 New Year’s resolutions! Whether sustainability is already a key component of your business model or you’re just getting started, we encourage you to join in by making adjustments (big and small) to your business practices in support of a clean and healthy ocean. See what others in the industry have pledged on Mission 2020’s Who’s In page.

We believe that the global PADI family is a force for good that can help play a critical role in protecting and preserving our oceans for the future if we all make conservation a priority at our places of business.

Have You Renewed Your PADI Membership for 2019?

Maybe you’ve been busy during the past several months and haven’t had the time to renew your PADI Membership for 2019. If you haven’t renewed, please use one of the following methods as soon as possible to maintain your renewed membership status.

  1. Renew OnlinePADI Pros’ Site
  2. Renew by Email; memdep@padi.com.au
  3. Renew by Phone; +61 2 9454 2888

We appreciate you choosing PADI as your diver training organisation.

PADI Instructor Examinations for December 2018

1/12/2018 | Bangkok, Thailand

1/12/2018 | Auckland, New Zealand

1/12/2018 | Jakarta, Indonesia

4/12/2018 | Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

4/12/2018 | Rarotonga, Cook Islands

5/12/2018 | Dili, East Timor

5/12/2018 | Malapascua, Philippines

5/12/2018 | Nha Trang, Vietnam

7/12/2018 | Semporna, Malaysia

8/12/2018 | Dumaguete, Philippines

8/12/2018 | Cairns, Australia

8/12/2018 | Khao Lak, Thailand

8/12/2018 | Bali, Indonesia

8/12/2018 | Phu Quoc, Vietnam

11/12/2018 | Gold Coast, Australia

11/12/2018 | Anilao, Philippines

11/12/2018 | Gili Islands, Indonesia

13/12/2018 | El Nido, Philippines

14/12/2018 | Lembongan, Indonesia

15/12/2018 | Phuket, Thailand

15/12/2018 | Jeju Island, South Korea

15/12/2018 | Singapore

16/12/2018 | Bohol, Philippines

16/12/2018 | Manado, Indonesia

18/12/2018 | Koh Tao, Thailand

18/12/2018 | Koh Samui, Thailand

22/12/2018 | Koh Phi Phi, Thailand

Something We All Need

Cody Unser - First Step - Foundation

In 2008, something happened to Leo Morales that most of us can’t even imagine – his leg was amputated to stop aggressive cancer. But what would be lifelong setback for some didn’t deter him. Already a passionate diver, Morales not only went back to diving, he became an instructor and a tec diver. Then he set two records (depth and distance) for divers with disabilities. Then he . . . well, he grew into an impressive and accomplished person by any standard: a PADI AmbassaDiver, Tedx presenter, author and inspiring mentor for hundreds – maybe thousands of people. Amazingly, Morales says that if he could change the past and keep his leg, that he would not. “Scuba diving gave me my life back,” he says. He actually took his life back using scuba, leveraging it to do more and now gives back more than many would expect. Amazing.

It’s a moving story, but only one example that diving, beyond its force for healing the oceans, heals people – and there are more stories than you can count. Paraplegic at age 12 from transerve myelitis, after the discovering freedom and therapy scuba gave her, PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Cody Unser now uses scuba to help people living with paralysis, and participates in related research, through her First Step Foundation. Losing his legs in a combat zone, PADI Divemaster Chris Middleton, U.K. similarly found the healing power of scuba when he started diving with Deptherapy, and now works with Deptherapy to get more people involved.

And it’s not just physical healing. After serving in Iraq combat and discharged in 2014, US Marine Juan Gonzales had diagnosed Post Tramautic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It impeded having healthy connections with people – particularly his family – but discovered diving through WAVES (Wounded American Veterans Experience Scuba), which uses diving’s healing power to help veterans with physical or psychological wounds. Gonzales says the peace he experiences diving has been a major help in his battle with PTSD.

PADI Course Director Thomas Koch can’t hear, but with scuba, his “disability” turns into an advantage. Why? When his daughter Claire got her Junior Open Water Scuba Diver certification with PADI Course Director Cristina Zenato, they talked as fluently and as much as they always do – underwater, using American Sign Language.

There are hundreds of stories – miracles really – about how, through diving, people have helped, healed and comforted. There are literally hundreds of dive professionals and divers who serve divers with disabilities, and you bring honor and meaning to the dive community as a Force for Good.

But, the truth is, scuba’s healing power goes beyond this because everyone needs healing at times. The dynamics of life can often hurt. There are times when it feels like the weight of the world got dumped on your back. Maybe you can’t sleep and you’re not much fun to be around. Maybe the people you care about most don’t get to see your best, and yet they worry about you. And you see it in their eyes.

Then you go diving . . . and something wonderful happens. The worry world stays at the surface as you descend into the underwater world. Your mind clears. What’s really important can finally break through. Your buddy signals, “okay?” And for the first time in a long time, you really mean it when you reply, “okay!” Maybe it takes a couple of “doses” (dives), but you become you again. It reflects in the faces of those you care about.

My point is this. We share diving because it’s a wonderful experience that we’re passionate about, but we should also share it because it’s a restoring, healing experience. Some of us need it more than others, but that’s something we all need.

Wishing you the happiest New Year,

Dr. Drew Richardson

PADI President & CEO

Our Unshakable Foundation

Bonaire- Diver- Happy - Scuba Diving

Amid everything the PADI® organization does in a rapidly changing world, we need to always build on the foundation for everything the PADI family does. It’s what John Cronin and Ralph Erickson laid down first when they established PADI in 1966, it’s our foundation today and it will carry us into the future. That foundation is, of course, education: diver training. What we teach and how we teach have, will and must continue to change. But, that we teach will never go away. It can’t, because it’s not what we do, but who we are.

Training is PADI’s foundation, but the heart of it is not the PADI System, eLearning, instructor cue cards and the like. These are powerful modern tools, but in 1966, several years before all of these existed, you could take PADI courses and earn PADI certifications because our training foundation was already there, entrusted where it is today – in the hands of you and your fellow PADI Instructors, Assistant Instructors and Divemasters. Without you, the PADI System – the best education system in diving by a long shot – can’t do what it does so well, much as a Steinway piano can’t sound like a Steinway without a master at its keys.

Even with all the innovations in instructional technology, such as the rise of artificial intelligence and dynamic online learning systems, human teachers still bear the weight of the best education. Innovations are important to keep PADI training relevant in today’s dynamic, personalized online world, but you still need great instructors to have great training. As American author William Arthur Ward explained it: “The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.”

That describes the PADI family – more than 130,000 people who inspire others to learn, to dive and to care. Together we motivate divers to rise to new challenges, to have underwater adventures, to heal and help others with scuba, and to protect our fragile world. PADI Course Directors shape the future by passing our collective -wisdom to a rising generation of dive leaders, who will in turn inspire divers to do things we have not even imagined yet. Everything the global PADI organization does today has its roots in training, and that training has its roots in you, me and the rest of the PADI family.

Aristotle said, around 2,300 years ago, “Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all,” and that hasn’t changed – the PADI family doesn’t “teach diving”; we educate the heart and transform lives. That’s what makes PADI’s training foundation solid.

Good luck, good teaching and good diving,

Drew Richardson Ed.D.
PADI President and CEO

This article originally appeared in the 4th Quarter edition of The Undersea Journal.

PADI Freediver eLearning Now Available in More Languages

Written by Junya Kato, Regional Training Consultant, PADI Asia Pacific

The PADI Freediver program continues to go from strength to strength with the recent release of new languages via PADI eLearning.

PADI Freediver eLearning (Product Code: 70770-1) is now available in the following languages; English, Arabic, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Thai and Traditional Chinese.

After purchasing and sending this course for your students, PADI Freediver eLearning will become available for them to download through the PADI Library App. PADI Freediver eLearning will contain all three course levels; PADI Freediver, PADI Advanced Freediver and PADI Master Freediver. In addition to this, students can now also select their preferred language.  

Students learn by reading and viewing content that is supported by interactive imagery, graphics and videos. They can then complete the knowledge reviews and final exam, either offline or online. If internet connection is limited, the only time they need to be online is during the initial download as well as the uploading of their assessment scores from the above sections, once completed.

As PADI Freediver eLearning is a required material for all levels of PADI Freediver courses, Instructors must ensure that students have their own personal set of current PADI material (eLearning). Students must have this material available for study before the course, use throughout the course and reference afterwards, unless it is unavailable in a language understood by the student. If the course is not available in language that your student understands, please contact your Regional Training Consultant to discuss options.

With additional languages now available, the above requirements also apply to PADI Advanced Freediver and Master Freediver students. For example, if a student previously completed a PADI Freediver course without access to PADI Freediver eLearning due to language limitations and they would like to continue further courses with you, they will now need access to PADI Freediver eLearning, if available in a language they understand.

We hope these new languages help you with the PADI Freediver program in 2019. Please contact your Regional Training Consultant for any training and material enquiries.

PADI Members Achieve Record Certifications in 2018

For the 9th consecutive year, PADI Asia Pacific is pleased to congratulate PADI Members who in 2018 certified more PADI Divers in the Asia Pacific region than any year in PADI’s 53 year history.

As a PADI Member, you transform lives through teaching the world’s most popular dive curriculum. In 2018, you opened more hearts and minds than ever before to the beauty of the underwater world and also our obligation to protect it.

Danny Dwyer, Vice President at PADI Asia Pacific said, “Congratulations to PADI Members in Asia Pacific who achieved another record year for PADI certifications in 2018, the 9th year in succession. We thank PADI Members ongoing commitment to teaching the highest quality diving courses and offering the very best in diver training.”

There are a range of exciting new products, services and benefits in-store for PADI Members in 2019 and we look forward to working with you.

Congratulations again to PADI Members in Asia Pacific.

January Tips from the PADI Quality Management Team

Each month the PADI Quality Management team continues to bring you tips on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities. This month we heard from Quality Management Consultant  Kim Ngan.

Welcome to the New Year from your Quality and Risk Management team. In 2019 we are going back to basics to dig into the fundamentals of risk management practice. We will present seminars and webinars throughout the Asia Pacific region that will examine how to evaluate risk and then how to treat that risk in a scuba and snorkeling context. We will consider how to implement simple and pragmatic methods to reduce your physical and legal risk. We will introduce a way to evaluate risk using a three-prong approach, ‘EAP’ or ‘Environment – Activity – People’. Watch this space for more information.

Through articles in Surface Interval, we will bring you tips on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities.

SCUBA Risk Management – Back to Basics

Scuba diving is like driving a car. If you’re careful and pay attention it’s a very safe activity, but if you’re not it can be dangerous.” – Ronnie Prevost

Before you become a dive professional, do you remember being thrilled by simply diving to 10 metres? Breathing underwater, seeing the amazing marine life and experiencing weightlessness were new and exciting experiences for you.

Soon you became a PADI Divemaster, then a PADI Instructor and you began diving with your own open water students or certified divers. You might have even been taking these students or certified dives to lovely sites such as Chumphon in Koh Tao, Norman Reef in the Great Barrier Reef, Crystal Bay in Nusa Penida, or The Poor Knights in New Zealand. You found it was quite easy to dive deeper yourself. The water was often warm and clear and you had to pay special attention to stay within your no-decompression limits. It could also have been easy to forget that your students or newly certified divers could get a still buzz under the water at 10 metres.

Depth, Ratios & Good Judgement – The EAP Method

We know that things usually go wrong when we are not paying attention. Remember, we have a duty of care to students in training courses and to customers in recreational dives. Conduct a risk assessment before each and every dive, while also continuing to assess, evaluate and take into account any changing variables, during the dive. The ratios and depths listed in your PADI Instructor manual are maximum limits. This means that you must apply sound judgment in determining what is appropriate for training each time you conduct a course or program. You can conduct the PADI Adventure Deep Dive, for example, to a depth of between 18 metres and 30 metres. The depth you choose, within this allowable range, should be based on the environment, the activity and the people undertaking the activity.

E for Environment

The dive site you visit every day does not necessary have the same conditions every day. Supervising four Discover Scuba Diving (DSD) participants on a calm and sunny day with 20 metre visibility is very different from diving with the same number of DSD participants on the next day if it becomes rainy and windy with 5 metre visibility. What would you change in the way you conducted the dive?

It’s your professional responsibility to conduct an environmental risk assessment by evaluating variables such as – temperature, visibility, water movement, surface conditions and the entry and exit area. Use good judgment at all times. When conditions are marginal, make conservative decisions by reducing ratios, going to an alternate site, or even cancelling the dive.

A for Activity

What is the activity? Does it involve risks that are different to other activities? Deep dives, Discover Scuba Diving, overhead environments, drift dives and other dive activities have risks specifically associated with the activity itself. Evaluate these risks and if appropriate change the ratio, depth, or other variables.

P for People

The individual ability of each of your student divers, the certifications they hold, the group size, the number of certified assistants available and your personal abilities and limitations, should all be considered when evaluating the ‘P’ of the ‘People’ factor. You should reduce the ratio or the depth from the maximums if appropriate. Your PADI professional training and experience, plus the PADI resources – such as PADI manuals, references, Training Bulletins, The Undersea Journal, the PADI Pros’ Site and staff at your PADI Regional Headquarters – are all available to help you stay up-to-date and assist you in making sound judgements when you have any questions.

Why not start off the New Year by refreshing your knowledge about risk management from these references. Have a great 2019 and safe diving everyone.

Kim Ngan  | Quality Management Consultant, PADI Asia Pacific.

Email: qa@padi.com.au

Updated Dive Shop Locator Now Live

The updated PADI Dive Shop Locator (DSL) is now live in eight languages (with more to come) and makes it even easier for divers to find you. Here’s what’s new:

Responsive Design for Mobile Devices

The DSL was redesigned with mobile users in mind and is responsive to any device screen with familiar touch navigation.

Map Function

The map uses familiar mapping functions like dragging, zooming and selecting a map entry for more information. Users can redo searches in new areas and rest the map to their current location. Plus, hovering in the results pane highlights the dive shop flag for that particular dive center on the map as a visual indicator of its location.

Premium

Premium upgrade listings are given higher priority in searches and are shown at the top of search results. These listings also provide a more detailed dive shop profile and display the dive store’s logo. Plus, you can now list the courses available at your dive center by editing the account tab under Premium Listing at the PADI Pros’ Site.

Sponsored Ads

Sponsored Ads are now displayed with a yellow border in the results pane and yellow dive flag in the map area. As of 1st January 2019, advertisement display order will be randomized, which means anyone may be at the top of the results.

To take advantage of Premium Listing or Sponsored Ads, sign up via My Account > My Store Applications within your PADI dive shop PADI Pros Site account

Search Results

While all dive centers and resorts are shown in an unfiltered search, Five Star and Premium listings are given weighted priority. There are numerous filters available but to improve search results, dive centers can purchase a Premium Listing or Sponsored Ad or upgrade to a Five Star membership level. The weighting system is a balance of Five Star status, Premium Listing status, distance from center and search keywords.

Check out the improved PADI Dive Shop Locator today and be sure to provide your comments by using the feedback button.